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Posts Tagged ‘#NIEER’

Screenshot: NIEER’s website.

 

The State of Preschool 2016 has just been released by NIEER (the National Institute for Early Education Research) and it’s chock full of data about state-funded preschools during the 2015-2016 school year.

A great deal has changed since 2002, when NIEER released its first yearbook. At that time, “only two states served 50 percent of 4-year-olds and just three served more than 30 percent (which is now below the national average).”

Now, the yearbook points to examples of “remarkable progress,” noting:

“State funded preschool continued to grow in access, spending, and supports for quality,” and “enrollment and spending per child increased, as did states’ total investment in preschool.”

There is also bad news:  (more…)

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Screen Shot 2016-05-16 at 12.30.01 PM

 

 

“There’s progress, but…”

That’s the theme of the new “The State of Preschool” 2015 Yearbook, published by NIEER (the National Institute for Early Education Research).

On NIEER’s Preschool Matters blog, in a post called “Slow and (Un)Steady Does Not Win the Race: What Other States Should Learn from New York,” W. Steven Barnett, NIEER’s director, shares his frustration with the troublingly slow pace of policy action. (We’ve added the bold face and underlining for emphasis.)

“The economist John Maynard Keynes famously wrote: ‘The long run is a misleading guide to current affairs. In the long run we are all dead.’ Typically, this phrase is cited to support government intervention over waiting for the eventually self-correcting private sector. As this year’s State of Preschool marks 14 years of tracking state government support for preschool education, I find myself citing Keynes in exasperation with the slow pace of government intervention. At the current rate, it will be another 50 years before states can reach all low-income children at age four, and it will take 150 years to reach 75 percent of all four-year-olds.” (more…)

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