Feeds:
Posts
Comments

“Early childhood education benefits more than the kids who participate — it also helps their kids, even decades later.

“A new study of Head Start, the large federally funded pre-kindergarten initiative that started in the 1960s, found that the children of kids who participated were substantially more likely to graduate high school and attend college, and less likely to commit crime and become a teen parent.

“It’s the latest signal that a substantial investment in early childhood education, particularly when paired with well-funded K-12 schools, can have long-lasting benefits — and offers a striking extension of that research into a second generation.

“‘Our findings indicate that societal investments in early childhood education can disrupt the intergenerational transmission of the effects of poverty,’ write researchers Andrew Barr of Texas A&M and Chloe Gibbs of Notre Dame.”

“Who benefits from Head Start? Kids who attend — and their kids, too,” by Matt Barnum, Chalkbeat, September 19, 2017

Screen Shot 2017-09-28 at 10.37.45 AM

Screenshot: Committee on Economic Development website

Pay attention to Louisiana. It has a tax credit program that policymakers should know about.

“Louisiana pioneered its School Readiness Tax Credits in 2007,” according to “Pathways to High-Quality Child Care: The Workforce Investment Credit,” a policy brief published by the Committee for Economic Development, part of The Conference Board, a nonprofit, business-led policy organization.

In part, Louisiana’s tax credit “provides ECE directors and staff with a refundable credit linked to their educational attainment at four levels and work experience in a quality program. The credit amount increases as the credentials rise,” the brief explains.

The tax credit is “not an entitlement.” The only individuals who qualify are those who “voluntarily join the registry, achieve professional development, and have been working for at least six months in a licensed program that participates in the state quality rating system qualify for the credit.”

“The credit is adjusted for inflation annually,” and in 2014, “the value of the credit by qualification level ranged from $1,630 to $3,260 and a total of 3,770 individuals claimed it. The average credit was $2,150…” Continue Reading »

Screenshot of New America’s report.

 

What does high-quality pre-K look like?

It depends on where you look, according to a new report from the think tank New America.

“Since publicly funded pre-K programs are guided by varying intents, regulations, and funding approaches, there is little continuity in early learning. There are uneven standards for program quality, variable hours of coverage, incongruent eligibility requirements, and competing demands for accountability.”

Despite this “uneven” practice, the research does provide clear answers of what quality looks like.

To get a sharp picture of quality, New America’s report — “Indispensable Policies & Practices for High-Quality Pre-K: Research & Pre-K Standards Review” — “synthesizes recent meta-analyses and other studies” and “analyzes existing pre-K quality standards.”

Six themes emerged from this process: Continue Reading »

“As a former preschool teacher, I know what quality early learning and care can do for a child’s development, so I’m proud to introduce the Child Care for Working Families Act to address our child care crisis and support access to high-quality preschool so that all children are ready for kindergarten and beyond. This is not only the right thing to do for working families, but it’s a smart investment in our children, our future, and our economy.”

U.S. Senator Patty Murray (D-Washington), News Release, September 14, 2017

Screenshot: The Ounce’s website

 

Like most states, Massachusetts has limited data on its birth-to-5 early education and care system, making it difficult for us to answer basic questions such as “Where are all the 4-year-olds?”

Elliot Regenstein wants to change that. He’s the plain-spoken author of “An Unofficial Guide to the Why and How of State Early Childhood Data Systems,” which was just released by The Ounce, a national nonprofit that advocates for children.

“This is not one of those policy papers that earnestly describes how the world is supposed to be—this guide is a zealous exploration of how the world actually is,” Regenstein, the director of policy and advocacy at The Ounce, writes.

The unofficial guide is one of a series of “policy conversations” that The Ounce is sharing to “rethink education.” The policy conversations cover “innovative ideas about how we can bridge the early education and K–12 systems, improving the quality and outcomes of both.”

How can data help this effort?  Continue Reading »

Screenshot: Urban Institute website

 

Where are preschool-age children?

The Urban Institute, a nonprofit think tank, is providing answers with its new interactive data map — a great tool for advocates.

“Our interactive tool shows 10 important characteristics of 3- to 5-year-olds. It displays the characteristics by whether the children are enrolled in early education, whether their families are low income, or whether their parents are immigrants,” the institute says on its website.

“Understanding the characteristics of preschool-age children in our states and communities is an important first step for supporting children’s healthy development and school readiness.” Continue Reading »

 

This summer, the nonprofit Advocates for Children of New Jersey released a policy brief on its federal preschool development grants.

It’s an upbeat story – but one with an unknown ending. New Jersey has successfully expanded preschool programs. But it’s not clear what will happen to this growth once federal funding runs out.

The state made preschool history thanks to two New Jersey Supreme Court rulings that required officials to “provide quality preschool in 31 low‐income towns so that young children had the best opportunity to succeed in kindergarten and beyond,” the brief explains.

This investment paid off. “Three studies by the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) found that children who attended the state‐funded preschools showed significant progress in language, literacy, math and science and were substantially less likely to repeat grades.”

But after a small amount of additional expansion, progress on pre-K stalled.  Continue Reading »

%d bloggers like this: