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Archive for the ‘Strategies for Children’ Category

Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

 

The blog is on vacation!

We’ll be back in September.

Enjoy the final days of summer!

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Once again this year, the city of New Bedford welcomed children and parents to a back-to-school, kick-off event at the city’s Buttonwood Park Zoo.

The third annual — “Smooth Sailing into Kindergarten” — was a chance to see animals, explore the zoo, and meet principals, teachers, and community partners. This mix of fun and school-readiness activities creates an upbeat start to the academic year.

(more…)

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Amy O’Leary speaking at the Massachusetts State House. Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

 

If you’re happy and you know it, as the classic preschool song goes, clap your hands — and be sure to read Amy O’Leary’s first column for Young Children, a publication of NAEYC (the National Association for the Education of Young Children).

Amy — NAEYC’s governing board president and the director of Strategies for Children’s Early Education for All campaign — explains in the column how she has used the strategies that she learned as a preschool teacher to motivate adults — whether they are funders, legislators, or other early educators.

“I led sing-alongs in conference rooms across Boston with executives at large banks and partners at law firms. It was my way of bringing a little bit of the early education world into places that were new to me and intimidating.”

As president, Amy’s attention is on the future. She writes:

“We need to think about what could be and not focus only on what has already been.” (more…)

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Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

Strategies for Children is seeking a photography and multimedia media intern to document children and teachers in early education settings as well as our advocacy work at the State House and out in the community.

Our ideal candidate is a college student in the Greater Boston area who has experience in photography and video production.

We’re looking for someone who can create images and think strategically about how they will work on our blog as well as on Facebook and Twitter.

Responsibilities will include taking and editing pictures and videos as well as brainstorming about visual media strategies.

Specifically, we’re looking for photos and video of great classroom moments between teachers and students; of civic and business leaders advocating for early education; and of new ideas and strategies in early childhood education.

Qualifications:

• Own a camera.

• Knowledge of photo and video editing software.

• Knowledge of young children and early childhood education.

• Ability to travel around the Greater Boston area.

Our internships are unpaid, so interns must be able to earn college credit for this work or use it to complete a class project.

If you’re interested, please email a cover letter, a resume, and samples of your photography and/or videos to Titus DosRemedios, Strategies’ Director of Research and Policy, at tdosremedios@strategiesforchildren.org.

The submission deadline is Friday, August 17, 2018.

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Source: Strategies for Children

 

Full-day kindergarten – some children have access to it, but across the country many don’t.

In fact, “less than third of all states even require full-day kindergarten,” Education Week reports, adding:

“That’s one of the findings in a 50-state comparison guide to policies surrounding kindergarten through 3rd grade…” The guide was released by the nonpartisan, nonprofit Education Commission of the States.

“The newly updated report, which was released last month, finds that that only 15 states and the District of Columbia require full-day kindergarten.”

As the Children’s Defense Fund argues, “Unequal access to publicly funded full-day and full-week, high-quality kindergarten means too many young children lose a critical opportunity to develop and strengthen foundational skills necessary for success in school and lifelong learning.” (more…)

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Here at Strategies for Children, we’ve been lucky to have a first-rate group of interns. They help us expand our research, outreach, and advocacy.

Currently, we have three interns whom we’re happy to introduce: Anna Lenihan, Alexis Rickmers, and Becca Smith. Here’s a little more about each of them.

 

Anna Lenihan

I am a senior at Wake Forest University working towards a major in Psychology and a minor in Schools, Education, and Society. I plan on teaching for a few years and doing community-based work before entering the field of educational policy. My time at Strategies for Children has allowed me to see the importance of advocacy and community partnerships. At SFC, I have worked on connecting early childhood educators with government officials in order to emphasize the statewide importance of early childhood education. Strategies has allowed me to see how policy and advocacy can influence change at both the local and state level.

As a Cambridge native, I feel deeply invested in the quality of education in Massachusetts. I believe that education can change the world and that access to quality early childhood education gives children of all backgrounds the foundation they need to fulfill their potential. From the classroom to the State House, Strategies has given me the opportunity to see how change is truly made. (more…)

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Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

 

Early educators wear a lot of hats: they’re educators and advocates, they advise parents, and they help with public problems like the opioid crisis.

They are also woefully underpaid, and this creates, as House Speaker Robert DeLeo has said, an early childhood education (ECE) workforce crisis.

To better define the crisis, Strategies for Children has released a new policy brief – “ECE Workforce Needs: Local Solutions from Preschool Planning” – that’s written by Jenna Knight, an intern at Strategies and a student at Tufts University’s Eliot-Pearson Child Study & Human Development program.

“One thing that stood out for me is how typical these workforce needs are across the state and nation, but the community-generated approaches such as the ones I’ve highlighted come from a strengths-based lens,” Knight says. “Empowering communities to collaborate, identify connections, and use approaches that work for their needs and for families being served is essential to making effective progress, particularly on ECE workforce needs.” (more…)

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