Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Strategies for Children’ Category

 

Free tonight?

Come to the Wheelock Family Theater and join us for a screening of “No Small Matter,” a film about the power of high-quality early education.

The film features “stories of real children, families, and teachers, illustrating the impact of high-quality early childhood experiences.”

“No Small Matter” is also “firmly grounded in science… opening up the ‘black box’ of what’s happening inside children’s brains with exciting, stimulating animation and the voices of compelling scientists, physicians, and ECE experts,” the press kit explains.

The film is “designed to kick-start the public conversation about early care and education.”

To promote this conversation, tonight’s screening will include a reception and a panel discussion. Here’s the full agenda: (more…)

Read Full Post »

 

Members of the Massachusetts Education Equity Partnership. Source: Education Trust’s Twitter page.

 

Massachusetts is a great place to get a K-12 education — but not for everyone.

Many students in this state do extremely well on a national standardized test called the National Assessment of Educational Progress or NAEP. A May 2018 report from the state’s Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) says:

• “Massachusetts tied for first place on the grades 4 and 8 NAEP reading assessments,” and

• “On the NAEP mathematics assessments, Massachusetts tied for first with five other states at grade 4 and one other state on grade 8.”

But not every student does this well. Massachusetts is also home to “glaring and persistent disparities in opportunity and achievement that separate low-income students and students of color from their peers.”

That’s the finding of a new report called, “#1 for Some: Opportunity and Achievement in Massachusetts,” that has been released by the Massachusetts Education Equity Partnership, a growing coalition of nonprofit organizations. Strategies for Children is one of 15 current members. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

 

The blog is on vacation!

We’ll be back in September.

Enjoy the final days of summer!

Read Full Post »

 

Once again this year, the city of New Bedford welcomed children and parents to a back-to-school, kick-off event at the city’s Buttonwood Park Zoo.

The third annual — “Smooth Sailing into Kindergarten” — was a chance to see animals, explore the zoo, and meet principals, teachers, and community partners. This mix of fun and school-readiness activities creates an upbeat start to the academic year.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Amy O’Leary speaking at the Massachusetts State House. Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

 

If you’re happy and you know it, as the classic preschool song goes, clap your hands — and be sure to read Amy O’Leary’s first column for Young Children, a publication of NAEYC (the National Association for the Education of Young Children).

Amy — NAEYC’s governing board president and the director of Strategies for Children’s Early Education for All campaign — explains in the column how she has used the strategies that she learned as a preschool teacher to motivate adults — whether they are funders, legislators, or other early educators.

“I led sing-alongs in conference rooms across Boston with executives at large banks and partners at law firms. It was my way of bringing a little bit of the early education world into places that were new to me and intimidating.”

As president, Amy’s attention is on the future. She writes:

“We need to think about what could be and not focus only on what has already been.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

Strategies for Children is seeking a photography and multimedia media intern to document children and teachers in early education settings as well as our advocacy work at the State House and out in the community.

Our ideal candidate is a college student in the Greater Boston area who has experience in photography and video production.

We’re looking for someone who can create images and think strategically about how they will work on our blog as well as on Facebook and Twitter.

Responsibilities will include taking and editing pictures and videos as well as brainstorming about visual media strategies.

Specifically, we’re looking for photos and video of great classroom moments between teachers and students; of civic and business leaders advocating for early education; and of new ideas and strategies in early childhood education.

Qualifications:

• Own a camera.

• Knowledge of photo and video editing software.

• Knowledge of young children and early childhood education.

• Ability to travel around the Greater Boston area.

Our internships are unpaid, so interns must be able to earn college credit for this work or use it to complete a class project.

If you’re interested, please email a cover letter, a resume, and samples of your photography and/or videos to Titus DosRemedios, Strategies’ Director of Research and Policy, at tdosremedios@strategiesforchildren.org.

The submission deadline is Friday, August 17, 2018.

Read Full Post »

Source: Strategies for Children

 

Full-day kindergarten – some children have access to it, but across the country many don’t.

In fact, “less than third of all states even require full-day kindergarten,” Education Week reports, adding:

“That’s one of the findings in a 50-state comparison guide to policies surrounding kindergarten through 3rd grade…” The guide was released by the nonpartisan, nonprofit Education Commission of the States.

“The newly updated report, which was released last month, finds that that only 15 states and the District of Columbia require full-day kindergarten.”

As the Children’s Defense Fund argues, “Unequal access to publicly funded full-day and full-week, high-quality kindergarten means too many young children lose a critical opportunity to develop and strengthen foundational skills necessary for success in school and lifelong learning.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: