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Archive for the ‘Reading proficiency’ Category

 

Congratulations to Kansas City for winning an “All-America City” award for its “Turn the Page KC” reading program.

The Kansas City Star reports:

“‘We whooped and hollered,’ said Turn the Page KC Executive Director Mike English, describing the moment at the award ceremony in Denver on Friday when Kansas City was the first winner named.”

“The number of agencies collaborating in the effort are numerous, including school districts and charter schools, the Kansas City and Mid-Continent public libraries, Lead to Read, the United WayLiteracy Lab, the Local Investment Commission and others that marshaled hundreds of professionals and volunteers to the cause,” the Star adds.

And when we asked Mike about the award, he added, “The All-America City Award not only validates that our 3rd grade reading initiative is on the right track, but also provides fresh energy and excitement to our cause.”

“‘We applaud the big-tent coalitions in these award-winning communities,’ Ralph Smith, the managing director of the national Campaign for Grade-Level Reading, said in a written statement. ‘They put a stake in the ground around third-grade reading and made some big bets to improve the odds for early school success,’” the Star notes.  (more…)

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Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

The Campaign for Grade-Level Reading (CGLR) has announced its 2017 All-America City Award Finalists, and tomorrow it will announce the winners at an event in Denver, Colo.

“Each year, the All-America City Award, America’s oldest and most prestigious community recognition, is given to communities that exemplify outstanding civic accomplishments,” CGLR’s website says. “In 2017, NCL and the Campaign for Grade-Level Reading will recognize communities that have made measurable progress for low-income children on the key drivers of early reading success.”

We’re proud to note that two of this year’s finalists are Springfield and Worcester.

“Springfield has been recognized as a Community Pacesetter for making measurable progress in school attendance, summer learning and overall grade-level reading for children from low-income families,” according to a press release. (more…)

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A Lectio Institute. Photo: Alyssa Haywoode

We’re excited to share news from our former Strategies for Children colleague Kelly Kulsrud.

As we blogged last year, Kelly left Strategies to become a co-founder and executive director of Lectio, an organization that maximizes the impact of literacy programs for children by helping stakeholders design more effective literacy programs. Now, Lectio is planning to celebrate its work and call for more progress.

Since last year, Lectio has been tackling a key problem. As its website explains:

“Despite great promise and tireless efforts, most children’s literacy programs, instruction, and services produce only negligible effects.”

The solution: Lectio runs institutes to help literacy programs assess their impact.

“We guide stakeholders through a comprehensive analysis of their literacy programs and services, focusing on their goals, design, desired outcomes, and resource allocation.” (more…)

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Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

The clock is ticking and the Campaign for Grade-Level Reading (CGLR) is busily working toward its goal to “increase by at least 100 percent the number of children from low-income families reading proficiently at the end of third grade” in a dozen or more states by the year 2020.

Back in 2012, CGLR, Strategies for Children, and five Massachusetts cities announced “the creation of a statewide network committed to aligning research, policy and practice to move the needle on third grade reading…”

Since then, CGLR has been active on multiple fronts. Here’s a roundup of some recent accomplishments. (more…)

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“Tackling chronic absenteeism, providing early childhood education and improving third-grade reading would increase graduation rates in Mississippi, the Republican chairman of the Mississippi Senate Education Committee said last night.

“Sen. Gray Tollison, R-Oxford, also cited a link between low third-grade reading proficiency and the high likelihood of dropping out. ‘You’ve got to look back and say, “Where do we go to make the changes that need to happen?”’ Tollison said. ‘And it starts early; it doesn’t happen in high school. It doesn’t start when they turn 15 or 13; it starts when they’re born.’”

“GOP Leaders: Invest in Early Education, Reading to Raise Graduation Rates,” The Jackson Free Press, December 1, 2016

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This is one of a series of blogs featuring first-person accounts from early educators across Massachusetts.

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Jennie Fitzkee

Jennie Fitzkee

 

My name is Jennie Fitzkee. I am an Early Childhood Educator teaching the Full Day, multi-age class preschool class at Groton Community School in Groton, Mass. This my 33rd year of teaching preschool. Lucky me!

“Back in the day,” women were encouraged to become a nurse, secretary, or a teacher. Fortunately, I decided to become a teacher. I made a good career choice! I use the word “career” because teaching young children is far more than a job. It shapes the lives of children and educates parents. That is powerful; both a responsibility and a thrilling challenge. (more…)

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Photo: Caroline Silber for Strategies for Children

Photo: Caroline Silber for Strategies for Children

Want to spread early literacy? Send in a parent. Moms and dads who talk, sing, and read out loud can fill their children’s worlds with engaging, enriching language.

But the challenge for Springfield, Mass., and other cities is figuring out how to reach parents and engage them in sharing a love of language and learning with their children.

To find good ideas on family engagement, the Reading Success by 4th Grade initiative (RS4G), which is backed by The Irene E. & George A. Davis Foundation, did a simple thing: It asked parents.

“Focus groups of parents, and largely moms who participated in one of our three sessions, revealed what we knew: that parents have clearly moved into the digital age,” Sally Fuller writes in a blog post on the Davis Foundation’s Read by Fourth Grade website. “Email, for anyone who has children, is almost recognized as a thing of the past. Moms told us almost universally that their primary engagement with the world comes through social media and texting. The smartphone serves as the communications tool of choice.” (more…)

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