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Archive for the ‘Quotes’ Category

“ ‘The reality is that the cost of child care outpaces what families can afford,’ said Kim Davenport, managing director of Birth to 3rd Grade Alignment at Edward Street Child Services, a nonprofit in Worcester.”

“ ‘The earliest years set the foundation for later learning and life success,’ Davenport said. ‘The investment we make there now pays incredible dividends later. We know it. We have the science. We have the economics. We have the long-term outcomes. Now we need the investment.’ ”

 

“Child headed to preschool this fall? Better start saving now,” by Eli Sherman, Wicked Local Marshfield, July 2, 2018

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“…we remain deeply concerned about what has and will happen to the more than 2,000 children who have already been separated from their families, as well as what has and will happen to the families yet to be detained. Family detention also harms children – and indeed, there is an existing court ruling that limits the duration of child detentions, in acknowledgement of the harm they cause to children’s positive growth and development.”

NAEYC’s Statement on #FamiliesBelongTogether, June 18, 2018

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“Sudden, forcible separation of children from their parents is deeply traumatic for both. Above and beyond the visible distress ‘on the outside,’ this overwhelming experience triggers a massive biological stress response inside the child, which remains activated until that familiar caregiver returns. Even more important, continuing separation removes the most important resource a child can possibly have to buffer the effects of toxic stress—a responsive adult who’s totally devoted to that child’s well-being. Stated simply, each day we fail to return these children to their parents, we compound the harm and increase its lifelong consequences.”

Jack P. Shonkoff, Founding Director, Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, June 20, 2018 (more…)

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Sally Fuller testifying at the State House. 

“Growing up as the ‘whoops child’ for a mother who taught high-school English, Sally C. Fuller could not avoid being engulfed in a world of words. Her siblings were 10 and 12 years older, so Fuller wound up being her mother’s focus.”

“It was in 2005 that Fuller first became associated with the Irene E. and George A. Davis Foundation when she was named project manager for the Springfield Cherish Every Child initiative. She has most recently overseen the foundation’s Read! Reading Success by 4th Grade community initiative with a goal of ensuring all of Springfield’s children are reading proficiently by the end of the third-grade.”

“Fuller will be feted this week upon the occasion of her retirement with a gathering at the Community Music School.”

“For Sally Fuller and Reading Success by 4th Grade initiative, gift of words enriches children’s lives: Viewpoint,” by Cynthia Simison, MassLive.com, June 17, 2018

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“How can we all speak up on behalf of our county’s youngest residents? By using the power of our voice to create real and lasting change.

“Advocating for policy change can be big or small. For example, you can urge your government to invest more in schools. You can petition your school committee to adopt a health curriculum that has been proven to make a significant difference in outcomes, or you can mobilize residents to speak out on a critical community issue in person, via phone or online.

“Berkshire United Way would like you to join us in advocating for universal pre-kindergarten for our children. According to Nobel Prize winner Dr. James Heckman, ‘The basic skills needed for success are formed before children enter school. Investing early helps to prevent the achievement gap, and investing in our most disadvantaged children provides the greatest returns.’”

“Live United: Advocating for early childhood education,” by Kristine Hazzard, president and CEO of Berkshire United Way, the Berkshire Eagle, June 5, 2018

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Photo source: UMass Boston press release.

 

“A record number of people—more than 100—attended the Institute for Early Education Leadership and Innovation‘s fifth annual Leadership Forum on Early Education Research, Policy, and Practice on Saturday, May 19.

“The day celebrated graduates of the leadership institute’s early educator leadership programs, provided a platform for ECE practitioners to discuss leadership for change and innovation in the field, and facilitated dialogue about advancing leadership pathways in early education and care in Massachusetts.

Executive Director Anne Douglass noted in her welcoming remarks that ECE providers have historically been overlooked when it comes to driving change in the field despite the fact that they are the experts who do the work every day.

“ ‘Too often early childhood educators are thought of as objects of change, rather than change agents,” said Douglass.’ ”

“ ‘How do we build a movement around our leadership?’ Douglass asked the crowd. ‘The people who are going to fix this problem are in this room.’ ”

“Leadership Forum Draws Record Participation, Spurs Conversations About Early Care and Education,” University of Massachusetts Boston, May 23, 2018

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Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Childern

 

“Massachusetts Early Education and Out-of-School Time Leaders Celebrate Passage of Critical Funding to Benefit Low-Income Children: Housing Bond Bill signed today by Governor Baker includes reauthorization of successful capital fund for early education facilities construction and renovation”

“The Commonwealth needs an improved and expanded supply of facilities to meet the demands of families across the state who are looking for convenient, high-quality centers for their children,” said Michael K. Durkin, President and CEO at United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley.

Chris Martes, CEO and President of Strategies for Children added, “What a great day for children, families and programs across the Commonwealth. Facilities are a critical – and often overlooked – element to quality early education and afterschool centers. We have seen such dramatic results and positive outcomes for children from the Early Education and Out-of-School Time Capital Fund know that there is a long list of programs that could use funding.”

Bill Eddy, Executive Director of MADCA, the MA Association for Early Education and Care which represents early education and school age providers who serve low income families across the state, said, “This is an exciting renewal of the Early Education and Out of School Time Facilities Fund with $45m over the next five years to continue to improve the facilities and playgrounds where our youngest children are educated and cared for every day. These facility improvement funds create state-of-the-art spaces designed for young children and allow providers to expand facilities creating additional access to early education for low income children and their families, which also expands our workforce by creating new teaching positions. We are grateful that the Legislature included this once again and we applaud Governor Baker for signing this comprehensive bill with this Early Education Facilities Fund included.”

“EEOST is unique in the country for providing a large-scale public source of funding for facilities,” noted Theresa Jordan, Director of Children’s Facilities Finance for the Children’s Investment Fund. “The reauthorization of an additional five years places Massachusetts further ahead as a national leader in the provision of high-quality early education and care.”

United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley news release, May 31, 2018

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“The nonprofit arm of the world’s largest business federation is sounding a stern warning: The skills gap feeding an unprecedented labor shortage will only worsen if companies don’t directly provide child care solutions.

“The need to educate the next generation of employees is growing exponentially as more parents enter the workforce, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation told executives during a yearlong road show across the U.S.—from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to Grand Rapids, Michigan, to Austin, Texas.”

“As much as companies might cringe at the thought of mixing business with early childhood education, mounting evidence shows that to stay competitive they must stop expecting cash-strapped state governments to fill day care gaps, said Abby Hills, director of communications for the foundation’s Center for Education and Workforce.”

“Child Care Is Corporate America’s Business,” by Jennifer Oldham, Slate, May 7, 2018

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