Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Quotes’ Category

Mayor Bill de Blasio. Photo: Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office

 

“When classes begin this fall, some schools will welcome their youngest students ever.

“New York City is starting to make good on a pledge to provide free, full-day pre-K to children who are 3 years old, an effort announced by Mayor Bill de Blasio this spring. Dubbed 3-K for All, the initiative is an expansion of the city’s popular Pre-K for All program, which now serves 70,000 4-year-olds across the city. While the effort for younger students is starting in just two school districts, the city plans to offer it citywide by 2021.”

“New York City’s 3-K For All preschool program starts this fall. Here are five things we know so far,” Chalkbeat, July 18, 2017 (more…)

Read Full Post »

“The problem is Massachusetts has a significant and persistent achievement gap, evident long before children enter school. Too many children show up for school already behind and too many of them will never catch up.

“As we have stated before, our country’s next greatest investment should be early childhood education.

“After all, the human brain develops more rapidly between birth and age 5 than during any other subsequent period.

“And according to several studies, children who participate in high-quality early childhood programs develop better language skills, score higher in school-readiness tests, and have better social skills and fewer behavioral problems once they enter school than those who do not have the benefit of pre-K services.”

“Early ed for all,” an editorial in the Cape Cod Times, July 16, 2017

Read Full Post »

“We don’t have to talk anymore about the value of early childhood education: everyone agrees it’s critical. We do, however, have to talk about affordability, logistics and policy. With preschool tuition running $10,000-$30,000 per year, the cost of sending one child to preschool can be more than a family’s rent or mortgage. Early childhood education is not just a child development issue, it’s an economic one…”

“To address this issue, the city convened an Early Childhood Task Force in 2014. Its 2015 report articulates the admirable vision that “all children in Cambridge [will] receive high quality early education and care from birth through third grade,” and recommends initial steps toward that goal…”

“To start this process, the council and committee will have a joint roundtable discussion this fall. One of the main tasks of the roundtable should be to set a deadline by which a comprehensive system of early childhood education will be in place. A deadline will force us to answer, sooner rather than later, the questions related to policy, financing, and logistics.

“Some of those questions are: (more…)

Read Full Post »

Our own Titus DosRemedios, Strategies for Children’s director of research and policy, was interviewed by the Toronto-based Preschool Podcast. Here are some excerpts of what Titus said:

 

“We have started to look at data on our early education and care workforce, and it’s kind of shocking how low the salaries are, how high the turnover is — the average salary is about $25,000 in the field for an early education and care teacher, turnover rate is about 30 percent. So we’re paying these borderline poverty wages for teachers that we’re expecting will be able to close the achievement gap and help children get ready to succeed in school. So there’s a mismatch between what our vision and hope is for the system and the level of investment there is in the teachers…”

 

“Access we thought was pretty good. And we actually spent many years pushing on quality because we thought that was the missing piece… But in recent years, we’ve started to uncover that in many parts of the state access is actually not that great. We have what we call Gateway Cities in Massachusetts… And what you find is that many children, high percentages of children in these small urban cities are coming to kindergarten without having any form or preschool whatsoever…”

 

“The secret to third-grade reading scores is not to get a new curriculum in third grade. It’s to work from birth all the way through age 8 or 9 and think about that entire continuum: working with families, infant-toddler programs, preschool programs, home-visiting programs, and, of course, the early elementary grades…”

 

“Data-driven early childhood education advocacy,” The Preschool Podcast, June 27, 2017

Read Full Post »

“That’s where professors Stephanie Jones and Nonie Lesaux at the Harvard Graduate School of Education come in.

“They’re launching a study, ‘The Saul Zaentz Early Education Initiative’.

“They’re gathering information from 5,000 families in Massachusetts with three and four-year-old children and plan to follow them over the next five years – all of the information will be confidential.

“‘It’s a ground-breaking study that will influence conversations and policies around early education in the U.S. with the goal of doing better with all children and their families,’ said Lesaux.

“Nationwide, preschool is expensive and the quality can be uneven.

“‘The challenge, actually, is only two in 10 experiences are high quality so only two in 10 children have access to a high quality early education experience,’ said Jones.”

“Eye On Education: Harvard Study Aims To Strengthen Preschool Learning,” CBSBoston, June 28, 2017

Read Full Post »

 

Eva’s parents are “in quite a bind: having to choose between leaving baby Eva in the care of others at this young age or losing job security during this crucial family transition. They also worry about even finding child care that they can afford. Eva’s parents are not alone. Many parents in our nation are feeling these pressures.”

“Getting it Right for our Babies,” The Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, the University of California, Berkeley, June 6, 2017

Read Full Post »

“With the ‘Hope Starts Here’ partnership, Kresge and Kellogg want to ensure every kid in Detroit has access to early childhood education from age three to five.

“La June Montgomery Tabron, president and CEO of Kellogg, tells Detroit Today that three out of every eight children age five and under don’t have access to early childhood education in the city.

“‘What we believe is that it puts the child on the best course if they have many developmental opportunities from birth to kindergarten,’ says Montgomery Tabron.”

“Kresge and Kellogg Foundations Join Forces to Boost Early Childhood Education in Detroit,” WDET, June 7, 2017

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: