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“There is no debate that the earlier children get access to education, the better they perform over the long run.”
– David Hopkinson, a Portland parent

“When you do early childhood education, you are helping set up a kid up for their career in education, so that they are going to be much more successful down the road. And that ends up saving money.”
– Portland Mayor Ethan Strimling

“Portland votes to expand Pre-K education,” News Center Maine, March 6, 2019

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In “other industries across many states, apprenticeships are a well-established and effective way to train workers with ongoing mentorship, on-the-job experiences, and corresponding coursework. The success of this model has encouraged places like Philadelphia to utilize Registered Apprenticeships to train early childhood educators.

“Not only are Registered Apprenticeships about providing indispensable on-the-ground experience for prospective early educators, but they are paid. With many early educators earning near-poverty level wages, the earning while learning element of the Registered Apprenticeship model is crucial. Apprenticeships can also serve as a route to earning a college degree and a pathway for career advancement, further breaking barriers that current and future early educators potentially face.”

“Earning While Learning with Early Educator Apprenticeship Programs,” by Cara Sklar and Julie Brosnan, New America, February 21, 2019

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“As most any couple will tell you, you’re never actually fighting about the dishes. You’re fighting about what doing the dishes says about how you’re valued and respected. In Congress, likewise, and in our early childhood education (ECE) community, we’re often not fighting about the thing we appear to be fighting about. Instead we are grappling with questions about motives and compromises. We’re wrestling with questions about whose voices get to lead, get sidelined, and get dismissed. And we’re confronting questions of control, fear, privilege, power, and trust. Let’s call this the ‘work beneath the work.’

“As a new Congress struggles to find a way forward, and ECE attempts to detangle its ‘thorny knot,’ policymakers, advocates, and influencers are engaging with (or avoiding) that deeper work. But as early childhood advocates who must engage, it is imperative that we assume responsibility for the systems and sequences we design, especially those of us (and I count myself among them) who have, in some way and because of some unearned attributes, benefitted from one or many of these systems.”

“The Work Beneath the Work: What We’re Fighting About When We’re Fighting About Our Profession,” by Lauren Hogan, New America, February 19, 2019

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“On February 5, 2019, President Trump addressed the nation and declared the State of the Union strong. But something was conspicuously absent. Education, specifically early education, is a fundamental necessity in any strong union, or nation, and yet, was a missing piece of the President’s address.”

“Throughout the entirety of his speech, there were key themes including the value of research and technological advances. Over the last century, technology has led to innovative growth and advancements that drive a stronger economy. However, the fundamental and necessary means to achieve these advancements were noticeably absent — a strong, national education system.”

“Mr. President, you forgot one thing. The children.” By Mark Reilly, Vice President of Policy & Government Relations of Jumpstart, a national early education nonprofit. Posted on Medium, February 7, 2019

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“For example, the Episcopal Health Foundation (EHF) in Texas recently committed $3.4 million to give the state’s youngest residents the best chance for healthy futures. The prominent health-focused funder has already made 12 grant commitments to organizations across the state to impact the lives of local children from pregnancy through age three. But unlike many early childhood grants that focus on the educational capacity of babies and toddlers, this effort is largely about promoting physical and mental health.”

“A big emphasis in EHF’s grantmaking here is the need for strong attachment between babies and caregivers to promote early brain development. One of EHF’s strategies in this regard is supporting healthcare providers, including all levels of clinicians and staff that work with pregnant mothers and infants. The other strategy is supporting community-based organizations that can train families on supporting brain development of their own babies before and after birth.”

“Among Regional Foundations, Early Childhood Commands Growing Attention,” by
Alyssa Ochs, Inside Philanthropy, February 6, 2019

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JD Chesloff, executive director of the Massachusetts Business Roundtable, was interviewed at the Ready Nation 2018 Global Business Summit on Early Childhood, which was held late last year in New York City.

 

 

Interviewer: “Why use and focus on early learning as a key driver to close the achievement gap?”

JD Chesloff: “One of the members of the roundtable used a really great analogy. He said if you’re Michelin Tires and you have a hole in your supply chain of rubber, you immediately go to the beginning of that supply chain and fix it. And when we talk to a lot of employers, they’ll tell you that there’s a hole in the supply chain of workers. And if you’re going to use a strategy to go fix that supply chain, it makes a ton of sense to start at the beginning, and early childhood is that strategy.”

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“As the 116th Congress gets underway, refiling the Child Care for Working Families Act should be on its to-do list.”

[The bill would, in part, ensure “that no low- to moderate-income family pays more than 7 percent of its household income on child care.”]

“The financial burden placed on young families seeking quality care and education for their children isn’t sustainable. In a June 2018 survey of 1,657 registered voters nationally, 83 percent of parents with children under five had “very serious” or “somewhat serious” problems finding appropriate care. At 54 percent, even most voters without young children said that finding quality, affordable child care is a “very serious” or “somewhat serious” problem in their area.

“That’s probably why support for greater public investment in early care and education is overwhelmingly popular across political divides and party lines.

“Early Education Should Be On The 116th Congress’ Agenda. Here’s Why,” an opinion piece by Anne Douglass, WGBH

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