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Archive for the ‘Professional development & preparation’ Category

“Leading the Way,” is a series featuring the next generation of leaders in the field of early education and care.

Lynn Santiago-Calling

For Lynn Santiago-Calling, leadership means connecting people.

Santiago-Calling is the new executive director of MAAEYC, the Massachusetts Association for the Education of Young Children, and she is working to help the organization grow.

MAAEYC is an affiliate of NAEYC, the National Association for Education of Young Children. Affiliates share NAEYC’s “core value” of “creating opportunities to widen our reach to early educators.”

“Our goal,” Santiago-Calling says, “is to move the profession forward.”

How? The organization is developing a strategic, five-year plan, and Santiago-Calling is building relationships. She and MAAEYC’s board want to increase membership and attract younger early educators.

“I’ve been going out to chapter meetings to get to know people, but those are the people who are already involved and engaged. I also want to hear from folks who are members but not actively engaged and ask them why aren’t you actively engaged? What can we do to engage you? Is there something that we’re missing? I want to hear from our members — and from nonmembers as well.” (more…)

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“High quality professional development for teachers working with young children is difficult to find and often too expensive for teachers to access. In hosting the Wonder of Learning, we’re making a commitment to the teachers of our region. We look forward to welcoming teachers here to learn, share, and grow professionally.”

Wheelock College President David Chard on the significance of “Wonder of Learning: The Hundred Languages of Children.”

 

“From intensive professional development seminars and in-classroom observations, to a multimedia showcase of the world-renowned schools of Reggio Emilia, Italy, the Wonder of Learning Boston 2018 is committed to inspiring and empowering all teachers to provide the highest quality programs for our youngest learners.”

Kelly Pellagrini, Board Member of the Boston Area Reggio Inspired Network

Wonder of Learning is “a traveling exhibit for educators, which includes workshops, hands-on learning opportunities, policy discussions, and family engagement, from June through November of 2018.Based on the Reggio Emilia early education framework, the event highlights best practices in early education and expects to draw 20,000 educators from across New England.”

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Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

 

Early educators now have access to this year’s version of the “Massachusetts Infant & Early Childhood Mental Health Professional Development Resource Guide 2018,” a listing of hundreds of training programs that can be downloaded here.

(The guide can be downloaded as a booklet or as a spreadsheet. If you download the spreadsheet, be sure to click on the tabs at the bottom of the spreadsheet so that you can see all the training sessions. You might have to scroll left or right — using the arrows in the lower left corner — to access all the tabs.)

The resource guide includes training programs for “para- professionals and professionals with a variety of educational backgrounds… from trainings for individuals with associates degrees to offerings geared towards advanced-practice clinicians with masters and/or doctoral degrees.”

Training session topics include: (more…)

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“Leading the Way,” is a series featuring the next generation of leaders in the field of early education and care.

Kretcha Roldan

Kretcha Roldan has spent her career combining social work and education.

That’s what she loved about her job as executive director of AVANCE, a nonprofit organization in Waco, Texas, that runs a two-generation education and personal development program for children and parents.

“I’m a social worker by training and by profession, but I fell in love with that concept: understanding how early education empowers parents to become children’s first teacher,” Roldan says. “It really helps the family to grow.”

Praised by former first lady Laura Bush, AVANCE serves Waco’s low-income, immigrant population.

Children and parents come to school each day. “The parents go to ESL classes or GED classes, and the children come to early childhood education classes. The parents also take parenting skills training.”

“Sometimes parents who have no means think that they cannot teach their children because they do not have the resources. When, honestly, what you need to teach a two-year-old are very basic things to have activity in their brain cells.” So the program helped parents tap their own ingenuity and creativity to use common household items to teach their children about numbers and colors.

“And both parent and child graduate. They both walk in with gowns.” (more…)

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Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

 

Early educators wear a lot of hats: they’re educators and advocates, they advise parents, and they help with public problems like the opioid crisis.

They are also woefully underpaid, and this creates, as House Speaker Robert DeLeo has said, an early childhood education (ECE) workforce crisis.

To better define the crisis, Strategies for Children has released a new policy brief – “ECE Workforce Needs: Local Solutions from Preschool Planning” – that’s written by Jenna Knight, an intern at Strategies and a student at Tufts University’s Eliot-Pearson Child Study & Human Development program.

“One thing that stood out for me is how typical these workforce needs are across the state and nation, but the community-generated approaches such as the ones I’ve highlighted come from a strengths-based lens,” Knight says. “Empowering communities to collaborate, identify connections, and use approaches that work for their needs and for families being served is essential to making effective progress, particularly on ECE workforce needs.” (more…)

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Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. 

 

“We have to change the conversation so that those who are suffering feel freer to talk about their circumstances and receive treatment,” Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito said to a roomful of early educators and staff members from home visiting and early intervention programs who were all there to participate in a groundbreaking training session on the opioid crisis.

This was the first of six training programs that will be held across the state in an effort to reach 600 professionals who work with young children. It’s also a sad but necessary recognition that the opioid crisis takes a toll on infants, some of whom are born addicted to opioids, as well as on toddlers and young children whose parents struggle with addiction.

Massachusetts has been hit hard by this crisis. According to the state’s Opioid epidemic website: (more…)

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This is the debut of “Leading the Way,” a series featuring the next generation of leaders in the field of early education and care.

 

Michele Dambrosio

Justin Pasquariello

For Justin Pasquariello and Michele Dambrosio, leading the way in early education means making substantial investments in people.

Last year, Pasquariello became the executive director of the East Boston Social Centers (EBSC), a 100-year-old nonprofit, multiservice agency that runs a number of programs, including an early learning program, that’s run by Dambrosio the early learning administrator.

The two administrators run their early learning program with the supports found in a school system, providing transportation for children and a career ladder for staff. And they’re leading the way on public policy, talking about the next big policy steps for early education.

“We really need a paradigm shift in the United States, and we’ve done it in the past” Pasquariello says, noting that years ago the country expanded the definition of public education to include high school, and, eventually, kindergarten. It’s time now, he says, to do what other nations have done and recognize “the need for high-quality universal free (or at least affordable-to-all) early learning.” (more…)

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