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Archive for the ‘Pre-kindergarten’ Category

Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

Every year, thousands of young children enter foster care just as they’re getting old enough to enter school — and they face challenges in achieving success.

“On any given day upwards of 400,000 children in the U.S. foster care system are living in the care of someone other than their biological parents,” the American Institutes for Research says on its Education Policy Center InformED Blog.

The post is the first in a series “examining educational challenges facing youth in foster care—early childhood into college—and some promising solutions.”

Children in foster care creates considerable instability.

“One-third of these children enter the foster care system before age five, just as they should be making the transition from preschool to kindergarten. Seventy-five percent must change schools when they enter the foster care system, and during their first year in foster care, they experience an average of three different home placements—often changing schools again and again.” (more…)

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Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

Washington, D.C, is the “pre-K capital,” “where nearly all 4-year-olds (and most 3-year-olds!) go to school,” according to the online news site LA School Report.

Why does a California-based publication care about Washington, D.C? Because Los Angeles is about to make its own investment in early education.

What makes D.C. a pre-K capital?

“Spurred by a landmark 2008 law, the District enrolls 85 percent or more of its four-year-olds (depending on who’s counting) and an even more remarkable 60-plus percent of three-year-olds.”

So on a Wednesday morning at “the Lincoln Park campus of AppleTree Early Learning, a network of pre-K charter schools,” young students are “nearing the end of a three-week unit on paleontology and archeology.” (more…)

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Photo: "At Smart Center pre-K today, it turned out my glasses weren't quite the perfect fit..." Mayor Kenney's Facebook page

Photo: Mayor Jim Kenney “At Smart Center pre-K today, it turned out my glasses weren’t quite the perfect fit…” Source: Mayor Kenney’s Facebook page

Philadelphia has a new first: the city is using a tax on soda to support an expansion of early education and other public programs.

Last month, “The City Council gave final approval to a 1.5 cent-per-ounce tax on sugary and diet beverages,” according to the local ABC television station.

“Only Berkeley, California, had a similar law. Soda tax proposals have failed in more than 30 cities and states in recent years. Such plans are typically criticized as disproportionately affecting the poor, who are more likely to consume sugary drinks.

“But Democratic Mayor Jim Kenney sold the council on the idea with a plan to spend most of the estimated $90 million in new tax revenue next year to pay for prekindergarten, community schools and recreation centers. Kenney says the tax will generate $386 million over 5 years.” (more…)

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“Opportunity starts at the beginning of each and every child’s life. And while income inequality and stagnant wages have left millions of families struggling, common-sense policies like preschool and high-quality affordable child care ensure that regardless of a child’s zip code or life circumstances, every child gets a fair shot at life.

“Each year we don’t institute universal preschool or a national child care solution, our children, our families, our economy and our future lose out.”

“The Kids Are Still Not Alright: It’s time for the United States to expand early childhood education programs,” by Arne Duncan, former U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. News and World Report, July 21, 2016

 

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Image: Zero to Three

Image: Zero to Three

 

Zero to Three, the national nonprofit, decided to tune in to parents by going largely “to Millennials and Generation X mothers and fathers—to learn more about the challenges they face, the help they seek and how satisfied they are with the parenting support and information they receive.”

It was “a comprehensive research effort” that included “a series of in-home discussions and a large national parent survey” of a diverse range of parents whose children were ages 0 to 5.

One goal: to help parents put the powerful science of early childhood brain development into action.

“I want to be the catcher,” one father says about the role he plays for his children, explaining that when he was young, his father wasn’t there to play football with him.

“I just thought it was going to be like this TV show and it was great and everything was wonderful,” one mom says. “I read the books. I felt super prepared and then reality hits. You are like, what the hell happened? None of that stuff is as it was planned. Things go wrong and things change.”

These are some of the responses in the report, “Tuning In: Parents of Young Children Tell Us What They Think, Know and Need,” which comes with infographics and videos of parents sharing their thoughts.

Specifically, Zero to Three asked parents:

• “What they understand about brain development and the impact that early experiences have on children’s long-term development”

• “Whether they believe that parenting skills can be learned”

• “What they struggle with most when it comes to childrearing”

• “How their own childhood experiences affect how they approach parenting,” and

• “What kind of information they want to receive, where they go for parenting help, whether it’s serving their needs”

Common themes emerged in parents’ answers, including:

• “When it comes to attitudes, aspirations and parenting challenges, there is more that unites than divides parents.”

• “Parents universally believe that parenting can be learned and that if they had more positive parenting strategies they would use them.”

• “Dads are more than babysitters. They love being involved fathers, and want—and deserve—more credit.”

• “There is a ‘missing’ first year,” because parents don’t realize “how young babies are when they can begin to feel complex emotions, and how deeply they can be affected by the way parents interact with them in the first months of life.”

• “There is an expectation gap when it comes to understanding children’s capabilities.” Parents sometimes “overestimate the age at which children master some important developmental skills,”

• “Parents face a discipline dilemma.” They “want to use effective approaches, but many say that finding the right way to discipline is hard,” and

• There’s also a trust gap: “Parents want advice, but are overwhelmed by sources of help and underwhelmed by the quality of what they’re getting.” In addition: “Half of parents aren’t getting the support they need when they feel overwhelmed or stressed—the time when help is most important.”

To address these challenges, the report issues a multi-step call to action that asks professionals who work with families to:

• provide parents with clear “science-based information about early development” and ways they can use this information to nurture their children”

• Use “the voices and experiences of real parents in any efforts to support parents of young children.”

• “Help parents find positive disciplinary strategies that work.”

• “Celebrate and harness fathers’ commitment to be involved in raising their young children.”

• Develop media that presents child-rearing advice in “relatable ways,” and

• “Create opportunities for parents to learn from each other—to share challenges, brainstorm solutions, and offer support.”

The need for creative, engaging, community-based opportunities to learn more about parenting can be summed up by one father’s comment about his son.

“Teach me now. You show me. And at the same time, I’ll teach him, and we’ll teach each other. I want that.”

To join the discussion on social media, use #ParentForward.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“How can we use this? How can we get this in the hands of parents, especially when children are little?”

That’s the question education officials in Burlington, Mass., asked about the book “Make Time for Reading,” — by author and early literacy expert Jean Ciborowski Fahey — in a news story produced by local television station BCAT TV. The story features interviews with Burlington School Committee member Kristin Russo and Burlington Area Chamber of Commerce president Rick Parker.

This book was chosen for its unique qualities and design. The pages alternate. The left hand-pages have tips for parents and caregivers about reading to children. And the right-hand pages feature a story that adults can read to children.

The Burlington School Committee is teaming up with the Burlington Area Chamber of Commerce to distribute the books to families, according to Superintendent of Schools Eric Conti. Parents of new babies will receive the book while at the hospital or in the mail. So far, roughly 1,000 copies have been given to families. The goal is to distribute a total of 1,500.

It’s a great fusion of books, adults, children, and community action around early literacy.

 

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Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

“What does it take to get preschool right?” NPR asks in this article.

Answers can be found in a new report from The Learning Policy Institute (LPI) called, “The Road to High-Quality Early Learning: Lessons from the States.”

The institute “conducts and communicates independent, high-quality research to improve education policy and practice.”

“Although many studies show that high-quality preschool returns $7 to $10 for every dollar invested, the research shows that it is not so easy to create high-quality preschool at scale, and not all programs reap these benefits,” Linda Darling-Hammond, president and CEO of the LPI says in a press release. “This study looks deeply at how governments can design and implement programs that pay off for their children and their state.”

NPR says the report “helps balance the preschool debate by highlighting a handful of states that appear to be getting pre-K right: Michigan, West Virginia, Washington and North Carolina.” (more…)

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