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Archive for the ‘NAEYC’ Category

This is one of a series of blogs featuring first-person accounts from early educators across Massachusetts.

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My name is Kristen Allen, and I am a preschool teacher at the Goddard School in Bellingham. I have been in the field since 1985, when my work-study job at UMASS/Boston was in the campus child care center. At the time, I was studying geography, and I hoped to teach high school environmental science and spend my summers leading canoe trips. After that first exposure to toddlers, though, I was hooked!

I have worked in almost every aspect of the field — in classrooms; running my own licensed family child care program when my children were young; training women to operate their own licensed family child care businesses; managing a home-visiting program for young mothers; providing mentoring, coaching, and training to early childhood professionals at workshops and conferences nationwide; coordinating USDA child and adult care food programs; and working on early childhood policy issues. (more…)

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Amy O’Leary

We are extremely proud to announce that Amy O’Leary has been elected president of the Governing Board of the National Association for the Education of Young Children.

As readers of this blog know, Amy is the director of Strategies for Children’s Early Education for All Campaign — and she served on NAEYC’s Board from 2011-2014.

Amy’s term as president begins on June 1, 2017, and she’ll serve in this volunteer position for four years.

“I am honored and thrilled to have been elected President-Elect of the NAEYC Governing Board,” Amy says. “This is an exciting time for young children, families, and early educators, and I am excited for this opportunity to serve. I believe in learning by doing, and, so far, I have taken the skills I needed to captivate 4-year-olds in circle time, and used them when I’ve met with legislators at the State House. I believe my perspective as an early educator combined with my current work as an advocate working on local, state, and national policy — as well as my passion for supporting the early education workforce — will all serve me well in my work on the NAEYC Governing Board.” 

Other candidates who were elected to the Board are:

Board Member at Large

Dina C. Castro, Professor and Velma E. Schmidt Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Education, University of North Texas

Board Member at Large

Tamara Johnson, Executive Director, Malaika Early Learning Center, Milwaukee, WI

Student Board Member

Megan Pamela Ruth Madison, Currently a Doctoral Candidate at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management with a concentration in Children, Youth and Families Policy, Brandeis University

The Board also has two newly appointed members:

Carl L. Hairston, Executive Vice President and Chief Lending Officer City First Bank of DC, Washington, DC, who will serve as NAEYC Treasurer

Stacia Tipton, Marketing and Research Consultant, Washington, DC, who will serve as a Board member at Large

To read more about Amy, go to our staff website page, and stay tuned for future updates on President O’Leary.

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Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

How do you build “a more inclusive sandbox” where more collaborators can lend their support to early education?

Our own Titus DosRemedios, director of research and policy at Strategies for Children, provides good answers in an article that ran this fall in NAEYC’s journal, Young Children.

The sandbox metaphor comes from social justice activist Michael Skolnick, who was featured in a New York Times profile. Skolnick was making the point that the civil rights movement needs more allies.

The sandbox metaphor,” Titus writes, “could also apply to the field of early education, which currently faces a similar challenge. The early childhood education movement has grown steadily over the past two decades, plateaued in recent years, and currently is in dire need of reinforcements.” (more…)

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This is one of a series of blogs featuring first-person accounts from early educators across Massachusetts.

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Jennie Fitzkee

Jennie Fitzkee

 

My name is Jennie Fitzkee. I am an Early Childhood Educator teaching the Full Day, multi-age class preschool class at Groton Community School in Groton, Mass. This my 33rd year of teaching preschool. Lucky me!

“Back in the day,” women were encouraged to become a nurse, secretary, or a teacher. Fortunately, I decided to become a teacher. I made a good career choice! I use the word “career” because teaching young children is far more than a job. It shapes the lives of children and educates parents. That is powerful; both a responsibility and a thrilling challenge. (more…)

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Image: Screenshot from NAEYC's website

Image: Screenshot from NAEYC’s website

 

Turn off the television news for a while and tune into an inspiring election that’s all about children: NAEYC’s election for its 2017 Governing Board.

Here’s how the election process works:

“As a membership association governed by an elected board, NAEYC is committed to diverse leadership on the Governing Board. The slate for each year’s election is identified by the Nominating Panel. Candidates are chosen to reflect broad knowledge and awareness of the issues facing the Association. They are selected for their ability to objectively consider the variety of perspectives inherent in decisions affecting the Association’s future, not to represent a particular group, region, or interest.”  (more…)

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Average cost of child care across the states. Screenshot: New America's website

Average cost of child care across the states. Image: New America’s website

What’s the state of child care in today’s America, which is no longer the land of the “Leave it to Beaver” breadwinner-homemaker family?

To find out, the newly released Care Report and the accompanying Care Index look at all 50 states and the district of Columbia to assess three categories: cost, quality, and availability.

The bad news: “no single state does well in all three categories. Instead, families, providers, and policymakers in every state make difficult compromises that often shape family decisions and can determine the course of children’s futures.”

That’s a problem in today’s America where “in a majority of families with children under 18, all parents work for pay outside the home. That means, on any given day, about 12 million children under the age of five will need a safe place to go and someone loving to care for them.”

The report and the index were produced by the think tank New America and by Care.com, the website that links families to care providers, in conjunction with other organizations. (more…)

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“I came to believe that the topic of high-quality early care, development, and education spoke to the future of a country I love. My reading of history, and how social progress is achieved, gave me the philosophical understanding that doing right by our children is essential for our nation’s future. It requires building a ‘movement,’ one for everyone’s child. A real ‘movement’ can never be built just for ‘those children,’ whoever they may be; it must be about all our children.”

“The future of our country is being built on our work in early childhood development. We all must play a role in helping every child succeed. We are overdue, my friends. Nearly 120 years ago, The New York Times wrote an editorial with these words: ‘Given one generation of children properly born and wisely trained, and what a vast proportion of human ills would disappear from the face of the earth.’”

David Lawrence, Jr., retired publisher of The Miami Herald and chair of The Children’s Movement of Florida, in his gust blog, “Investing Early: The Best Sort of Nation-Building,” posted on the NAEYC website, July 1, 2016

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