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Archive for the ‘Multimedia’ Category

Image: Screenshot of Mass.gov website.

Image: Screenshot of Mass.gov website.

 

Looking for ways to keep children healthy and safe in early education and care settings?

Check out the webpage “Health and Safety in Child Care” on the website of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH).

DPH has collected links to information on a sweeping range of topics, including nutrition, physical activity, asthma, and the flu — as well as on hand washing, immunizations, and how to prepare for emergencies.

Click around the site and you’ll also find:

• a weather chart for safe outdoor play on hot and cold days

• information on preschool vision screening

• the pyramid model of social and emotional health

• information about diabetes and epilepsy, and

• the Department of Early Education and Care’s statement on cleaning, sanitizing, and disinfecting

There’s even information that can be shared with families.

So check out these resources and keep child care healthy and safe.

 

 

 

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“Early educators do more than care for young children. We are constantly stimulating children’s brains and children’s thinking in a way that helps build the foundations for what eventually becomes the roots of language, science and technology and mathematics and engineering.” (more…)

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Image Source: ReadyNation's Flickr page

Image Source: ReadyNation’s Flickr page

 

Last week, New York City hosted the 2015 Global Business Summit on Early Childhood Investments.

The summit was “a major gathering of 200+ business people, policymakers, and experts designed to showcase how the private sector is leading the way in advancing early childhood development around the world.”

The event was held by ReadyNation, an organization of business leaders who work to “strengthen business through better policies for children and youth.”

The goal of the summit was to “inspire and equip executives to take actions that expand support for young children at all levels.” Among the themes was a focus on “new evidence that establishes early childhood as the foundation for a culture of health and international leadership for early childhood.”

Chris Martes, president and CEO of Strategies for Children, attended the event and said, “The summit clearly shows how excited our business leaders are about investing in young children. Business leaders understand that high-quality early education and care programs help to produce the labor force of the future.” (more…)

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We pulled a quote from this video last year, but it’s also well worth watching.

FIND (Filming Interaction to Nurture Development) is a simple, powerful way to help caregivers see their best interactions with children on film.

As this YouTube video’s caption explains: “At Children’s Home Society of Washington, social service providers are using video clips of parents interacting with their young children to help the parents identify their own strengths and learn which interactions best promote healthy development. Created in partnership with researchers at the University of Oregon and Oregon Social Learning Center, this intervention supports positive interactions in young families facing adversity and models an innovative co-creation and testing process for science-based strategies.”

The video was posted by Harvard’s Center on the Developing Child.

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Drawing on work done by Harvard’s Center on the Developing Child, this video explains how resilience develops in children.

At just over two-and-a-half minutes long, the video is short enough to be used in talks or shared on social media.

It was posted by the FrameWorks Institute, a nonprofit organization that advances “the nonprofit sector’s communications capacity.”

 

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“The majority of my students this year have attended preschool. And I have not had a classroom like this — ever.”

Lori Shabazz, the Agnes Meyer Outstanding Teaching Award winner in 2014 and a kindergarten teacher at Patrick Henry Elementary School in Alexandria, VA., where U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Learning Libby Doggett recently visited.

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What are the next steps in education reform? Paul Reville, former secretary of education in Massachusetts, answers the question in a recent Boston Globe op-ed.

“When the education reform bill was enacted in the early 1990s, its main goal was to educate all students to high levels. And all meant all,” Reville writes.

Currently a professor of “practice of educational policy and administration” at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Reville has had time to reflect on the state’s challenges and opportunities.

He notes that Massachusetts will have to spend more on “specialized services, including early childhood education.” He also writes that early education is among “the strategies that the state needs to develop over the next few years.”

Read the Globe article to learn more about how Massachusetts can ensure that “all means all.”

To hear Reville discuss “All Means All,” check out this short, informative video. It’s part of Harvard Ed School’s 8 for 8 series.

Reville is also the director of Harvard’s Education Redesign Lab, which “is focused on building a new education ‘engine’ that will ensure economically disadvantaged students have a fair chance of mastering the skills and knowledge necessary for success in the 21st century and of closing historic achievement gaps.”

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