Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Massachusetts Cities and Towns’ Category

Photo: Titus DosRemedios

 

A new early childhood champion is being born: Wednesday, January 1, 2020 will be the official start of One SouthCoast Chamber, a regional chamber of commerce that covers Fall River, New Bedford, and parts of Rhode Island.

And the new organization — which unites the SouthCoast Chamber of New Bedford and the Bristol County Chamber of Fall River — has already announced a key area of focus: early childhood education.

“Over the next few months, business leaders and educators will collaborate to develop a plan to expand high-quality pre-kindergarten and childcare in the region, particularly in Fall River and New Bedford,” a SouthCoast Today article says.

And Brian LeComte, the incoming chairman of the One SouthCoast Chamber board, tells SouthCoast Today:

“The business community wants to have a positive impact on the success of our region and there is no greater success we can champion than early childhood education.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

ed 3

Springfield’s Educare Center. Photo: Magnus Monroe

 

Last year, civic partners broke ground on Springfield’s Educare Center.

Now, as construction is winding down, the Educare Center is growing into a state-of-the art facility that will serve 141 children, as a BusinessWest.com article reports.

Nikki Burnett, the executive director of Educare Springfield, tells BusinessWest.com that the neighborhood deserves the $14 million, 27,000-square-foot facility, which is part of a national network of high-quality early education and care programs. There are 24 Educare centers around the country, but this is the first one in Massachusetts. (more…)

Read Full Post »

 

Local communities are ready for preschool expansion, but often lack the funds to get started. Absent a clear federal or state path for preschool expansion, innovative local leaders are forging ahead using a variety of collaborative approaches.

Last week, Strategies for Children hosted a webinar on this topic: “Local Preschool Financing Strategies in Massachusetts.” Three communities presented their work, and 15 other communities participated in the webinar.

Here’s a recap of the event and the topics we discussed.

We heard from Holyoke, Springfield, and Boston, all communities that are leading the way on financing more preschool spots for children through a mixed-delivery system.

Presentations were made by: (more…)

Read Full Post »

EEC Commissioner Samantha Aigner-Treworgy wants to hear your thoughts about early education and care. Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

 

“We want to hear from you!”

That’s the message from the Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) which is hosting a Community Learning Tour, a series of community meetings across the state.

The goal: “help us create a road map for EEC’s work in the years to come!”

The first session is today at 3 p.m. in EEC’s Taunton office, at 1 Washington St., Suite 20.

EEC Commissioner Sam Aigner-Treworgy wants your input to help her department craft “a plan for Massachusetts in which all children develop as lifelong learners and contributing members of the community, and all families are supported in their essential work as parents and caregivers.”

Your feedback will help EEC craft policies that best meet the needs of the early education field and the needs of the children and families it serves.

Here’s the schedule for the upcoming sessions:

Metro Boston: October 29, 2019 5:30 to 7:30 PM at EEC’s Quincy Office
Northeast: November 13, 2019 5:30 to 7:30 PM at EEC’s Lawrence Office
Western: November 14, 2019 4:00 to 6:00 PM at the Community Foundation of Western MA
Central: November 18, 2019 5:30 to 7:30 PM at EEC’s Worcester Office
Boston: November 19, 2019 2:00 to 4:00 PM at EEC’s Boston Office

Can’t come to the learning sessions?

Fill out the Strategic Plan Discovery Survey. In addition to answering questions, you can upload any information you want EEC to have, including important research, feedback, or planning documents.

Please share this information with your personal and social media networks. It’s a great chance to help Massachusetts build an increasingly stronger system of early education and care.

Read Full Post »

 

There’s an exciting, new education bill in the State House: the Student Opportunity Act.

It calls for “an unprecedented $1.5 billion new investment in Massachusetts public education,” a fact sheet says.

The bill also notes that K-12 education can benefit from strong preschool programs.

“The proposal — jointly announced by House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo, Senate President Karen E. Spilka, and other legislative leaders — aims to bridge the divide in educational opportunities between poor and affluent systems by directing more money to districts that serve greater concentrations of students living in poverty or those with language barriers,” the Boston Globe reports.

 

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Photo: Kate Samp For Strategies for Children

 

Here’s some good news.

Holyoke, Lawrence, and Northampton have received state funded Commonwealth Preschool Partnership Initiative (CPPI) grants that they can use to expand their preschool programs.

These towns join the first cohort of grantees: Boston, Lowell, New Bedford, North Adams, Somerville, and Springfield.

Here’s some bad news.

This fiscal year, Massachusetts has only allocated $5 million for CPPI grants. And that’s not enough to make up for the fact that federally funded Preschool Expansion Grants (PEG grants) have expired.

“Sadly, the budget did not include our primary ask of $25 million for preschool expansion,” Titus DosRemedios, Strategies for Children’s director of research and policy, writes in an Alliance for Early Success blog post. “This amount would have replaced expiring federal Preschool Expansion Grant (PEG) funds ($15 million), sustained current state-funded preschool expansion grantees ($5 million), and expanded preschool in new communities ($5 million).” (more…)

Read Full Post »

 

Chrissy Howard, the new manager of Reading Success by 4th Grade, sums up her job with a question:

“How can I use any resource I have to help other people get what they need?”

For Howard this a tactical issue and a matter of social justice.

Launched by the Irene E. and George A. Davis Foundation, Reading Success by 4th Grade has engaged the Springfield, Mass., community in the work of helping children become proficient readers by the end of third grade. The organization was led by Sally Fuller, who recently retired.

Howard joined the organization this summer just as it had found a new home at the Springfield Public Library.

“My job is to continue to bring people together and move the work forward,” Howard says. To do this, she has embarked on a listening tour where she has heard about what people need, want, and love as well as “what they found a little difficult; what challenges they’ve overcome, and how they did it together.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: