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Archive for the ‘MA Legislature’ Category

Amy O’Leary and Commissioner Samantha Aigner-Treworgy

 

What a year it has been at Strategies for Children! Here are some of our highlights:

• Looking back to look forward

In December of 2018, we gathered at the State House to celebrate the tenth anniversary of An Act Relative to Early Education and Care, which became law in 2008. “It’s like getting the band back together,” Pat Haddad (D-Somerset), Speaker Pro Tempore of the House, said of the many colleagues who joined us. At the event, Amy O’Leary moderated, and we heard from a lineup of speakers including Haddad, House Speaker Robert DeLeo (D-Winthrop), other state officials, and local early education program directors. Many of the speakers remarked that though they have had different roles over the last ten years, their commitment to high-quality early education for all remains strong.

It was also a year of transition at the Department of Early Education and Care (EEC). In June we thanked Commissioner Tom Weber for his six successful years of leadership. We then welcomed new EEC Commissioner Samantha Aigner-Treworgy back to Massachusetts with a “meet-and-greet” co-hosted by the early education field. We look forward to working with Commissioner Sam on a shared vision for her department’s future. (more…)

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Last month, Governor Charlie Baker signed the Student Opportunity Act into law – enacting a $1.5 billion investment in K-12 schools across the state that provides a badly needed update to the state’s school funding formula.

In addition — as we explain in this month’s Early Education for All update — the new law requires school districts to close the achievement gap through proven interventions. Several options are listed in the law, including “expanding early education and pre-kindergarten programming” by working with community-based organizations. (more…)

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“America, It’s Time to Talk About Child Care.”

That’s the title of a new report that declares what a lot of parents already know: America has a child care problem.

“…the federal government does not treat early childhood education as a public good nor does it provide adequate funding to support it,” the report says. “This chronic underfunding has led to a shortage of affordable, quality child care across the nation. And to the extent that child care is affordable for families, it is largely because early educators earn very low wages, and many must struggle to feed their own families.”

Eight organizations released the report jointly. They are: the Center for American Progress, the American Federation of Teachers, the Center for Law and Social Policy, Community Change, Every Child Matters, MomsRising, the National Women’s Law Center, and the Service Employees International Union.

This shortage of affordable, high-quality child care makes it tough for parents to go to work, which slows down the economy.

“Right now, the U.S. economy loses an astounding $57 billion per year in revenue, wages, and productivity as a result of child care problems,” the report warns. (more…)

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There’s an exciting, new education bill in the State House: the Student Opportunity Act.

It calls for “an unprecedented $1.5 billion new investment in Massachusetts public education,” a fact sheet says.

The bill also notes that K-12 education can benefit from strong preschool programs.

“The proposal — jointly announced by House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo, Senate President Karen E. Spilka, and other legislative leaders — aims to bridge the divide in educational opportunities between poor and affluent systems by directing more money to districts that serve greater concentrations of students living in poverty or those with language barriers,” the Boston Globe reports.

 

(more…)

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Samantha Aigner-Treworgy

 

On Tuesday, early educators from across the state attended a meet-and-greet with the new commissioner of the Department of Early Education and Care (EEC), Samantha Aigner-Treworgy – although, as she explained to one attendee, she goes by Sam.

 

Joel Cox, Partners for Community, and Aigner-Treworgy

 

“Thank you all for being here and for the very, very warm welcome home,” Aigner-Treworgy, a Massachusetts native, said at the event, which was held at the downtown Boston law firm Goulston & Storrs. (more…)

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Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

 

On July 31, 2019, Governor Charlie Baker signed the FY20 state budget into law. The new budget includes good news for early education and care, so please take a minute to thank the governor and members of the Legislature.

The governor did not veto any spending, preserving the $43.3 billion conference committee budget which was passed by the Legislature on July 22, 2019.

This year’s budget was bolstered by increased tax collections, and it includes a plan to control pharmaceutical drug costs, according to State House News Service.

The FY20 budget for early education and care represents continued progress and investment. This is the seventh consecutive budget since the historic spending low-point of FY13 that increases investments in young children, families, and early educators. It is the second year in a row that state investment has exceeded the pre-recession high-point of investment in FY09.

The FY20 budget also includes a $20 million rate increase for early educator salaries, $5 million in preschool grants through the Commonwealth Preschool Partnership Initiative, and $5 million in workforce development grants to community colleges. 

We’ve posted a complete list of early education line items as well as a Department of Early Education and Care funding trends chart  that covers fiscal years 2009 to 2020. 

So please let Governor Baker and your state legislators know that you appreciate them for investing in high-quality early education in this year’s state budget. 

For more information, contact Titus DosRemedios at tdosremedios@strategiesforchildren.org or (617) 330-7387.

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Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

 

After weeks of delay, the six-member conference committee has released a fiscal year 2020, $43.1 billion state budget for Massachusetts.

The budget was bolstered by increased tax collections, and it includes a plan to control pharmaceutical drug costs, according to the State House News Service.

Where the House and Senate differ on the allocations for early education and care line items, this budget includes the higher funding amounts. This includes a $20 million rate increase (from the House budget), $5 million in preschool grants (from the Senate budget), and $5 million in workforce development grants (from the House). 

The Legislature passed the budget on Monday, July 22. Governor Baker now has 10 days to sign the budget into law. He can also make line item vetoes. 

For more information contact Titus DosRemedios at tdosremedios@strategiesforchildren.org, (617) 330-7387.

For updates and a complete list of early education line items, visit Strategies’ state budget webpage.

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