Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Higher Education’ Category

This is one of a series of blogs featuring first-person accounts from early educators across Massachusetts. This one was written by Lisa Plotkin.

*     *     *

Lisa Plotkin

Lisa Plotkin

When I graduated high school, I spent the summer as a preschool camp counselor. I came home every afternoon exhausted and took a nap. “Childcare – definitely NOT for me,” I said.

In college, I pursued architecture and then business. My first job out of college was managing an architectural office. I left that job to re-calibrate and found myself surrounded by children again as a substitute then a classroom teacher at the JCC preschool in Washington, DC. Following this role, I moved to my hometown Richmond, Virginia, where my path crossed a year later with a little boy waiting for his sister’s dance class to end as I was waiting for my exercise class to begin. It was 2007.

We’ve all heard about those “light bulb moments,” right? I had one. Something in his conversation with me, how easy it was for us to chat, made it a moment I’d always remember. A joyful readiness hit me: I wanted to pursue a degree in the field of early childhood. So, I moved to Boston and earned my Master of Early Childhood Education at Lesley University. (more…)

Read Full Post »

This is one of a series of blogs featuring first-person accounts from early educators across Massachusetts.

*     *     *

Jennie Fitzkee

Jennie Fitzkee

 

My name is Jennie Fitzkee. I am an Early Childhood Educator teaching the Full Day, multi-age class preschool class at Groton Community School in Groton, Mass. This my 33rd year of teaching preschool. Lucky me!

“Back in the day,” women were encouraged to become a nurse, secretary, or a teacher. Fortunately, I decided to become a teacher. I made a good career choice! I use the word “career” because teaching young children is far more than a job. It shapes the lives of children and educates parents. That is powerful; both a responsibility and a thrilling challenge. (more…)

Read Full Post »

This is one of a series of blogs featuring first-person accounts from early educators across Massachusetts.

*     *     *

JennieMy name is Jennie Antunes, and I have worked in the early education field for 30 years. This past October marked my 29th year with NorthStar Learning Centers in New Bedford, Mass. I am presently a lead teacher in one of our toddler/preschool classrooms. I also have the responsibility of acting as designated administrator when the center director is out of the building.

Through the help of a scholarship program, I earned my bachelor’s degree in 2014. Even though I had been doing this work for so long, there was so much more I wanted to learn to strengthen my teaching. I take great pride in my accomplishments, proving to myself that I could work full time as well as attend school full time.

However, early educators’ pay continues to be a challenge. The goal to have teachers become better educated to better serve children and their families is fantastic and important. Guiding the development and learning of young minds is incredibly difficult and highly skilled work.  (more…)

Read Full Post »

Board 1

Amy O’Leary with Danielle Scanlon, Erin Vickstrom, Susan Norquist, Kristen Kelley, and Kristy Walley

 

Earlier this week, students from Quinsigamond Community College’s (QCC) Leadership in Early Education and Care program testified before the Board of the Department of Early Education and Care.

Accompanied by Amy O’Leary, director of our Early Education for All Campaign, the students share their experiences in the leadership program.

As we blogged a few weeks ago, QCC’s program “trains ‘students who are already working in early childhood centers’ as directors, supervisors as well as students who aspire to be leaders.”

“The courses are paid for by the Educator and Provider Support Grant, which is funded by the Department of Early Education and Care.” And students who already have bachelor’s degrees can apply the 15 credits that they earn in this program toward a master’s degree in early childhood leadership at Worcester State University. (more…)

Read Full Post »

 

The Obama administration has just a released a new report that sums up its point with its title: “High-Quality Early Learning Settings Depend on a High-Quality Workforce: Low Compensation Undermines Quality.” It has been jointly released by the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The report also features wage profiles for each state, including one for Massachusetts that’s posted here.

Wages are “sometimes at or near the Federal poverty line,” the report says, even when early educators “obtain credentials and higher levels of education.” It’s a deeply rooted problem that we blog about often, and one that other research reports have covered. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Photo: Micaela Bedell for Strategies for Children

Photo: Micaela Bedell for Strategies for Children

Quinsigamond Community College (QCC) has an exciting, new certificate program.

The Leadership in Early Education and Care program trains “students who are already working in early childhood centers” as directors, supervisors as well as students who aspire to be leaders.

“This innovative leadership certificate was designed to meet a known gap in degree options for the ECE field,” according to Charlene Mara, QCC’s Early Childhood Education Program coordinator.

The program’s classes are:

• Administration in Early Education and Care

• Supervision, Coaching and Mentoring in Early Childhood Settings

• Communication for Collaboration

• Advocacy and Ethics for Social Justice in Early Care and Education, and

• Seminar and Field Experience: Leadership in Early Education and Care

The courses are paid for by the Educator and Provider Support Grant, which is funded by the Department of Early Education and Care.

The first four program participants graduated last month. And another 20 or so additional students are expected to earn certificates during the 2016-2017 school year. (more…)

Read Full Post »

This is one of a series of blogs featuring first-person accounts from early educators across Massachusetts.

*     *     *

DSC00281
My name is Denise Galford-Koeppel. I graduated from Wellesley College with a degree in Psychology, focused on developmental psychology. I wanted to understand the developing child first hand, so after I graduated I worked as an early childhood educator at the Wellesley Community Children’s Center (WCCC) while completing a master’s degree from Wheelock College.

I learned more about development and families from my mentors at WCCC than I did in school, and I have continued relationships with them to this day through roles there as a parent, board member, substitute teacher, and now consultant.

After teaching at WCCC, I worked in the lab of a national research study called the NICHD* Study of Early Child Care (Early Childhood Research Network) that looked at the effects of childcare on child development. There, I met young children who enjoyed the lab activities; and I was drawn to children who developed differently, the ones who did not stack blocks or who had difficulty interacting with a caregiver. This inspired me to become a developmental specialist in early intervention. I have loved that work since 1994. (more…)

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: