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Archive for the ‘Early educators’ Category

“Leading the Way,” is a series featuring the next generation of leaders in the field of early education and care.

Lynn Santiago-Calling

For Lynn Santiago-Calling, leadership means connecting people.

Santiago-Calling is the new executive director of MAAEYC, the Massachusetts Association for the Education of Young Children, and she is working to help the organization grow.

MAAEYC is an affiliate of NAEYC, the National Association for Education of Young Children. Affiliates share NAEYC’s “core value” of “creating opportunities to widen our reach to early educators.”

“Our goal,” Santiago-Calling says, “is to move the profession forward.”

How? The organization is developing a strategic, five-year plan, and Santiago-Calling is building relationships. She and MAAEYC’s board want to increase membership and attract younger early educators.

“I’ve been going out to chapter meetings to get to know people, but those are the people who are already involved and engaged. I also want to hear from folks who are members but not actively engaged and ask them why aren’t you actively engaged? What can we do to engage you? Is there something that we’re missing? I want to hear from our members — and from nonmembers as well.” (more…)

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Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

 

On Thursday, May 10, 2018, Senate Ways and Means Chair Karen Spilka released a $41.42 billion budget proposal for fiscal year 2019.

The Senate budget is slightly higher than Governor Baker’s proposal and slightly lower than the House budget.

For early education and care, the Senate budget invests $5 million in preschool expansion, increases funds for child care resource and referral agencies, and level funds most other programs. Unlike the House, the Senate budget does not include a rate reserve for early educator salaries.

The Senate budget’s executive summary states: “Skills learned in early childhood directly impact future academic achievement and personal and economic success. The Committee’s budget invests in kids beginning at birth and seeks to remove barriers to access and quality care.”

Additional reporting on the Senate budget and its implications can be found at MassLive and The Boston Globe.

The Senate will debate amendments to the budget on May 22. Visit Strategies for Children’s website for a complete list of early education line items.

Stay tuned for more information on amendments and advocacy opportunities.

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“Leading the Way,” is a series featuring the next generation of leaders in the field of early education and care.

Ola Friday

Ola Friday grew up with educators. Her mother was a teacher and an assistant principal, and her father was a teacher. Friday knew she wanted to be in education, but when the time came to choose between Teach for America or a policy fellowship, she was excited about policy.

“What we know from early childhood is that you get your greatest return on investment when you invest in the education of our youngest children,” Friday says. “From a policy and analytical perspective, it just makes sense to be invested in this work.”

Friday invested herself into the work. She earned a master’s degree in public policy from the University of California, Berkeley, where she also took classes in the education school. She studied with David Kirp, an emeritus professor of public policy who also writes about early education.

Friday went on to work in New York City, helping to develop and implement QUALITYstarsNY, the city’s first quality rating and improvement system. She moved on to Pennsylvania where she helped overhaul the early childhood education career ladder. And along the way, she earned a Doctor of Education Leadership degree from Harvard’s Graduate School of Education. (more…)

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“High quality professional development for teachers working with young children is difficult to find and often too expensive for teachers to access. In hosting the Wonder of Learning, we’re making a commitment to the teachers of our region. We look forward to welcoming teachers here to learn, share, and grow professionally.”

Wheelock College President David Chard on the significance of “Wonder of Learning: The Hundred Languages of Children.”

 

“From intensive professional development seminars and in-classroom observations, to a multimedia showcase of the world-renowned schools of Reggio Emilia, Italy, the Wonder of Learning Boston 2018 is committed to inspiring and empowering all teachers to provide the highest quality programs for our youngest learners.”

Kelly Pellagrini, Board Member of the Boston Area Reggio Inspired Network

Wonder of Learning is “a traveling exhibit for educators, which includes workshops, hands-on learning opportunities, policy discussions, and family engagement, from June through November of 2018.Based on the Reggio Emilia early education framework, the event highlights best practices in early education and expects to draw 20,000 educators from across New England.”

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Yesterday, hundreds of early educators from across the state — many wearing green and snapping cell phone pictures – gathered for a rally at the State House steps for Advocacy Day. An upbeat band, featuring tuba and trombone players, wove through the crowd, filling Beacon Street with music.

 

Leo Delaney

 

“It really is about the workforce,” Leo Delaney said. He’s the president of the board of MADCA (the Massachusetts Association of Early Education and Care), and he was the first speaker. “Without quality staff, you don’t have quality.” (more…)

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Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

 

Early educators now have access to this year’s version of the “Massachusetts Infant & Early Childhood Mental Health Professional Development Resource Guide 2018,” a listing of hundreds of training programs that can be downloaded here.

(The guide can be downloaded as a booklet or as a spreadsheet. If you download the spreadsheet, be sure to click on the tabs at the bottom of the spreadsheet so that you can see all the training sessions. You might have to scroll left or right — using the arrows in the lower left corner — to access all the tabs.)

The resource guide includes training programs for “para- professionals and professionals with a variety of educational backgrounds… from trainings for individuals with associates degrees to offerings geared towards advanced-practice clinicians with masters and/or doctoral degrees.”

Training session topics include: (more…)

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“Leading the Way,” is a series featuring the next generation of leaders in the field of early education and care.

Kretcha Roldan

Kretcha Roldan has spent her career combining social work and education.

That’s what she loved about her job as executive director of AVANCE, a nonprofit organization in Waco, Texas, that runs a two-generation education and personal development program for children and parents.

“I’m a social worker by training and by profession, but I fell in love with that concept: understanding how early education empowers parents to become children’s first teacher,” Roldan says. “It really helps the family to grow.”

Praised by former first lady Laura Bush, AVANCE serves Waco’s low-income, immigrant population.

Children and parents come to school each day. “The parents go to ESL classes or GED classes, and the children come to early childhood education classes. The parents also take parenting skills training.”

“Sometimes parents who have no means think that they cannot teach their children because they do not have the resources. When, honestly, what you need to teach a two-year-old are very basic things to have activity in their brain cells.” So the program helped parents tap their own ingenuity and creativity to use common household items to teach their children about numbers and colors.

“And both parent and child graduate. They both walk in with gowns.” (more…)

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