Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Developmentally appropriate practice’ Category

Photo: Screenshot of GEEARS report cover.

 

What does it mean to be school ready?

Different stakeholders have different answers – and that can lead to fractured efforts to help young children.

Georgia, however, has come up with a framework for school readiness that should help unite the actions of families, schools, and communities.

“The framework articulates not only the central components of school readiness but also the roles various stakeholders play in promoting it.”

This is an important step forward because many states have struggled to define school readiness.

To develop the framework, the nonprofit organization GEEARS: Georgia Early Education Alliance for Ready Students worked with state leaders to form a committee that solicited feedback from experts and from stakeholders across the state.  (more…)

Read Full Post »

Wheelock College has just posted a video from its 2016 Community Dialogue that highlights the importance of early education.

As we’ve blogged before, this event engages early educators, policymakers, and elected officials in a conversation about the strengths and challenges of the field.

Among those featured in the video is Carlos Santiago, commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education, who says:

“We have certainly come to realize the importance of the success of students in early education as they come to our doors in higher education.”

Be sure to check it out.

Read Full Post »

 

How can parents change their children’s lives?

One answer is to go back to basics – specifically, the Boston Basics – “five fun, simple, and powerful ways that every family can give every child a great start in life.”

The five Boston Basics are:

• maximize love, manage stress

• talk, sing, and point

• count, group, and compare

• explore through movement and play, and

• read and discuss stories

These basics are backed by evidence and “encompass much of what experts find is important for children from birth to age three,” the Boston Basics website says. (more…)

Read Full Post »

A series featuring communities that have a plan to expand preschool.

Children in one of our PEG classrooms. Eligibility requirements for PEG ensure that children in the program have not received previous educational opportunities and, presumably, would have started Kindergarten with no preschool experience

Lawrence is one of five Massachusetts communities implementing the federal Preschool Expansion Grant. This high-quality model funds 10 preschool classrooms for 130 of Lawrence’s children. The community also has a three-year strategic plan for further preschool expansion. Beyond serving more children, the plan includes cataloguing all local early education programs, engaging families in program planning, and creating a data sharing platform to help programs and agencies collaborate to serve children and families.

In Lawrence, the key components of school readiness for our 1,500 preschool and kindergarten children include connecting with families positively and early on; collaborating with community agencies in order to support children and teachers, as well as building systems for transitioning into the public schools; and supporting the whole child as well as the whole family so that we can improve stability for our families. (more…)

Read Full Post »

 

What do we know about preschool?

To find answers, researchers in different disciplines from a number of universities and from the think tank Brookings set up a task force to review the evidence “on the impact of state-funded pre-kindergarten programs.”

The result is a new report, “The Current State of Scientific Knowledge on Pre-Kindergarten Effects,” released by Brookings and Duke University. Videos of related panel discussions are available here.

This effort produced “one, clear, strong message,” NPR reports. “Kids who attend public preschool programs are better prepared for kindergarten than kids who don’t.”

“This timely report can guide states and local communities, including several here in Massachusetts, as they continue to expand access to high-quality preschool,” Titus DosRemedios, director of research and policy at Strategies for Children, says.

Included in the report is a six-part consensus statement that says: (more…)

Read Full Post »

Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

Next month, Harvard’s Graduate School of Education is hosting a two-day program on the Science of Early Learning and Adversity.

Participants will learn about the “leadership and organizational strategies that support the design and implementation of strong early learning environments — those that buffer stress, reduce challenging behaviors, and promote development.”

“…working with expert facilitators and colleagues, participants will develop a strategic plan for leadership related to stress and classroom management in the early learning environments they lead.”

This event will be on June 22 and June 23, 2017, and it is open to “early education directors and administrators across the mixed delivery system,” as well as to coaches and leaders of early education service organizations. Tuition is $199. (more…)

Read Full Post »

This is one of a series of blogs featuring first-person accounts from early educators across Massachusetts.

*     *     *

Jennie Fitzkee

Jennie Fitzkee

 

My name is Jennie Fitzkee. I am an Early Childhood Educator teaching the Full Day, multi-age class preschool class at Groton Community School in Groton, Mass. This my 33rd year of teaching preschool. Lucky me!

“Back in the day,” women were encouraged to become a nurse, secretary, or a teacher. Fortunately, I decided to become a teacher. I made a good career choice! I use the word “career” because teaching young children is far more than a job. It shapes the lives of children and educates parents. That is powerful; both a responsibility and a thrilling challenge. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: