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Archive for the ‘Cost and affordability’ Category

 

Child Care Aware of America and the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment collaborated to produce a new, short video that answers the question: “Why Do Parents Spend So Much on Child Care, Yet Early Childhood Educators Earn So Little?” 

Read more about the video by clicking here.

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“ ‘The reality is that the cost of child care outpaces what families can afford,’ said Kim Davenport, managing director of Birth to 3rd Grade Alignment at Edward Street Child Services, a nonprofit in Worcester.”

“ ‘The earliest years set the foundation for later learning and life success,’ Davenport said. ‘The investment we make there now pays incredible dividends later. We know it. We have the science. We have the economics. We have the long-term outcomes. Now we need the investment.’ ”

 

“Child headed to preschool this fall? Better start saving now,” by Eli Sherman, Wicked Local Marshfield, July 2, 2018

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This past Sunday at Lowell High School, 11 Congressional candidates shared a crowded stage at the Kathy Reticker Forum for Children and Families and shared their ideas on family policy.

“We’re asking these candidates today how they’re going to support our most important national asset. Where are they going to put their support?” Pat Nelson, the executive director of the Concord Children’s Center, said at the event. “Will they put it where it’s needed most, where we know it leads to early success, in prenatal care and kindergarten?”

“We know the battle for funding for children is a hard-fought battle, and we want to know how you are going to fight it.” (more…)

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“Helena Ferreira, the primary years teacher of English language learners at Provincetown Schools, spent $11,600 last year to enroll her two children in the town-sponsored Wee Care program.

“ ‘I’m a single mom of two kids,’ she said on Friday. ‘It was a difficult decision for me, but it put me at ease to have a place with high-quality child care, safety and education. That program allowed me to continue working.’

“Ferreira started using the program when her now three-year-old daughter, Beatrix, was four months old. Her now one-year-old son, Simon, started at Wee Care when he was six months old. Toddler tuition is $75 per day, with discounts for town residents and employees of the school. Preschool and prekindergarten tuition starts at $45 per day ($35 for a half day) and summer programs are $75 per day.

“These amounts add up, which is why Ferreira hopes town voters will approve three articles at the April 2 Annual Town Meeting that would make child care and preschool free for all infants to five-year-olds. The free tuition would be available only to Provincetown residents or town employees, said Provincetown Schools Superintendent Beth Singer.”

“Universal preschool up for vote at Provincetown Town Meeting,” Wicked Local Wellfleet, March 29, 2018

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Source: Jennifer Garner’s Instagram.

 

I was reminded of the magic of #Headstart and #EarlyHeadstart on today’s visit to #Educare in Washington D.C with @savethechildren. 75% of the families at this preschool/pre-K/daycare have household incomes at or below $9000 year! In Metropolitan D.C.! In these bright, cheerful, happily chaotic classrooms you’d never know– kids were too busy learning and growing, not to mention showing me the ropes. #quiethandsup #helpyourneighbor#brownnosebetty #investinkids#willtraveltoreadtokids

Actress Jennifer Garner, Instagram, March 13, 2018

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Source: Center for American Progress

 

What makes high-quality child care so expensive? The Center for American Progress has a new interactive tool that makes it easy to see how much quality costs.

Advocates can use this tool to deliver one of the most important policy messages in early education: Quality costs much more than many parents can afford.

The most expensive aspect of quality? Teachers’ pay and benefits.

To learn more, use the interactive tool. Click on the link above and enter your state and whether you want to see the costs for an infant, toddler, or preschool-age child.

Once you choose, a graphic pops up. There’s a picture of a classroom and a list of options with on/off switches such as “fewer children per teacher,” “increase contribution to health insurance,” and “make the classroom bigger.”

In Massachusetts, for example, the base price for a preschool child is $893 per month. But click on “provide more time for teachers to plan lessons,” and two (more…)

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It’s no secret that preschool can be a financial challenge.

As the title of this Business Insider article states: “In 23 states, it costs more to send your child to daycare than college.”

There is federal and state funding, but not nearly enough to meet the demand for high-quality programs.

The solution? Fix the EEC financing system, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine says in a new report – “Transforming the Financing of Early Education and Care.” This report builds on a 2015, Institute of Medicine report about transforming the birth-through-age-8 workforce.

Famous for issuing reports on science and health care, the national academies “provide nonpartisan, objective guidance for decision makers on pressing issues.”

The financing report sounds an alarm, noting: (more…)

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