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Archive for the ‘Child care’ Category

 

On Wednesday, January 23, 2019, Governor Charlie Baker released a $42.7 billion state budget for fiscal year 2020. The governor’s budget includes a $200 million increase in Chapter 70 state aid for K-12 public education. This is part of a larger proposal to overhaul the state funding formula.

Funding for early education and care would continue to increase under Governor Baker’s proposal, which includes increases for Supportive and TANF child care (line item 3000-3060) as well as for Quality Improvement (3000-1020). The Commonwealth Preschool Partnership Initiative (3000-6025) was reduced from $5 million in FY19 to $2.5 million. And an early educator salary rate reserve (3000-1042) was not included in the governor’s proposal.

For a complete list of early education line items, please go to our budget page

To learn more about the history of state funding for early education from FY09 to the present, check out our funding trends chart.

Stay tuned for advocacy opportunities. And contact Titus DosRemedios for more budget information at tdosremedios@strategiesforchildren.org or (617) 330-7387.

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When parents across the country can’t find child care, the economy loses a staggering $57 billion per year in lost earnings, productivity, and revenue.

That’s a crisis, according to a new report — “Want to Grow the Economy? Fix the Child Care Crisis” — released by ReadyNation, an organization of business executives who are “building a skilled workforce by promoting solutions that prepare children to succeed in education, work, and life.”

“The practical and economic consequences of insufficient child care are enormous, impacting parents, employers, and taxpayers.”

The report notes that parents face shortages in three areas: access, affordability, and quality. Specifically:

• “Nearly one-third of parents (32 percent) report having difficulty finding child care.”

• “The average annual cost of center-based child care for infants is more than the average cost of public college tuition and fees in 28 states,” and

• “Only 11 percent of child care nationwide is accredited.” (more…)

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Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

 

What does early education and care look like in Massachusetts? Is it mostly center-based? Or are families mostly relying on grandma and their next-door neighbors?

Answers are emerging from the Early Learning Study being run by the Saul Zaentz Early Education Initiative at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE).

Drawing from a survey of 90,000 Massachusetts households, researchers found that:

• 55 percent of families were enrolled in formal care settings

• 14 percent enrolled in informal care settings

• 14 percent used a mix of formal and informal care, and

• 17 percent of children were care for solely by their parents (more…)

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Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

 

Across the country, parents are discovering that they live in “child care deserts,” communities where they can’t find an appropriate spot for their children.

This is a particularly tough problem for the parents of very young children, according to a new report from the Center for American Progress called, “Understanding Infant and Toddler Child Care Deserts.”

The report looks at supply and demand in nine states — Indiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Montana, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Vermont, and West Virginia — and in Washington, D.C.

Nationally, child child care deserts aren’t just a problem in large, rural states, but also in the rural areas of smaller states — and anywhere where demand for child care is greater than supply. Past studies have shown, for example, that Massachusetts has a deficit of 93,119 child care slots. So when current programs are full to capacity, nearly 1 in 4 Massachusetts children is left without access to child care.” (more…)

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Screenshot: Center for American Progress

 

Now that Election Day is over, the country has a new cohort of leaders — and new opportunities to make progress on early education.

That’s the theme of a new report — “Early Childhood Agenda for Governors in 2019” — from the Center for American Progress.

“With 20 new governors and 16 re-elected governors starting new terms in January,” the report notes, “2019 has the potential to be a year of big change at the state level. This is particularly the case in the early childhood policy arena, as many newly elected governors discussed early childhood education as part of their campaigns.”  (more…)

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“About 70 percent of the rural population [in Illinois] lives in a childcare desert.”

 

Rasheed Malik, author of “America’s Child Care Deserts in 2018,” quoted in “Most Illinoisans live in ‘child care deserts,’ report says,” by Cole Lauterbach, Illinois News Network Dec 11, 2018

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Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

 

Child care can be expensive for working parents, but it’s even more of a financial burden for parents who are in college. To ease this burden, the U.S. Department of Education awards grants to help low-income college students.

It’s a vivid example of how helping parents manage the high cost of child care also helps them — and their children — succeed in school and in life.

Among the challenges that parent/students face is “time poverty,” according to an Inside Higher Ed article, which cites a study that says: “Students with preschool-age children had only about 10 hours per day to dedicate to schoolwork, sleeping, eating and leisure activities, compared to the 21 hours that childless students had.”

The article adds:

“Congress increased federal investment in financial aid for student parents in 2016 by upping the funding for the Child Care Access Means Parents in School program (CCAMPIS), a federal aid program for student parents, from $15 million to $50 million annually.” (more…)

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