Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Child care’ Category

Shiroma Herath and her family with Representative Jim McGovern (D-Mass).

 

Shiroma Herath decided to go to this month’s Strolling Thunder event to share her experiences grappling with the high cost of child care.

As we blogged earlier this month, Strolling Thunder drew families from across the country who came to talk to Congress about the concerns of babies and families.

Herath attended, along with her husband and her baby, and spoke to Representative Jim McGovern (D-Massachusetts); Nikki Hurt and Andrew Zack from Senator Ed Markey’s office; and Julia Frederick a staff person from Senator Elizabeth Warren’s office.

 

 

“I came from Sri Lanka to the United States three years ago as a green card holder with my husband,” Herath says of her family’s story. Three months after they arrived, the couple had their baby at UMass Memorial Medical Center. (more…)

Read Full Post »

“The nonprofit arm of the world’s largest business federation is sounding a stern warning: The skills gap feeding an unprecedented labor shortage will only worsen if companies don’t directly provide child care solutions.

“The need to educate the next generation of employees is growing exponentially as more parents enter the workforce, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation told executives during a yearlong road show across the U.S.—from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to Grand Rapids, Michigan, to Austin, Texas.”

“As much as companies might cringe at the thought of mixing business with early childhood education, mounting evidence shows that to stay competitive they must stop expecting cash-strapped state governments to fill day care gaps, said Abby Hills, director of communications for the foundation’s Center for Education and Workforce.”

“Child Care Is Corporate America’s Business,” by Jennifer Oldham, Slate, May 7, 2018

Read Full Post »

Strolling Thunder

Photo Source: National Head Start Twitter feed

 

This week, hundreds of families from all 50 states traveled to Washington, D.C., to be part of the advocacy effort Strolling Thunder.

Launched last year, Strolling Thunder is an opportunity for families to tell their child care stories. The goal is to “make sure that Congress thinks babies,” according to Myra Jones-Taylor, the chief policy officer of the national nonprofit Zero to Three, which sponsored the event.

“It’s really important that our legislators are taking care of our kids’ futures because it’s our country’s future too,” Amy Lingerfelt, a Kansas mom, told ABC news. Lingerfelt came to Strolling Thunder with her husband her 2-year-old son, Noah, who has a sensory processing disorder.

The family relies on WIC, a federal nutrition program, to be able to afford a special formula that Noah needs.

“There’s no way our family would be able to afford that without WIC,” Lingerfelt explained. That’s why, “Protecting and increasing funding for programs like WIC is just one of the policy priorities of Strolling Thunder.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

 

“I thought I was supposed to be so joyful. I had a healthy, beautiful, wonderful baby, but I was terrified. I was terrified how I would make ends meet.”

That’s the story of one of three moms who are featured in a new video, “Child Care Is Hard but It Doesn’t Have to Be,” released by the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC).

While NWLC was excited to celebrate the federal government’s recent investment in child care, the organization is calling on policymakers to do more.

“The next step is maintaining and increasing this funding next year and beyond, then passing the Child Care for Working Families Act!” Helen Blank, NWLC’s director of Child Care and Early Learning, said in a recent email.

Just over two-and-a-half minutes long, the video packs a powerful personal and policy punch. So please share the video and use some of NWLC’s social media messaging.

Here are a few examples of Facebook posts: (more…)

Read Full Post »

Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

 

Leaders in Ontario, Canada’s second-largest province, are talking a giant step forward: calling for a $2.2 billion plan to create full-day, fully licensed child care for “preschool children from the age of two-and-a-half until they are eligible to start kindergarten, beginning in 2020.”

Families would save some $17,000 per child.

“We listened to parents, educators and child care providers across the province, and they’ve told us this move is the right one to make,” Kathleen Wynne, the premier of Ontario said. “This investment will make life more affordable for families and allow more parents to make the choice to go back to work, knowing their child is safe and cared for.”

Currently in Ontario, “kids are eligible for junior kindergarten in the calendar year they turn four, and senior kindergarten the year they turn five,” the news magazine Maclean’s reports, adding: (more…)

Read Full Post »

Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

 

There’s great budget news for children and families.

Last week, Congress officially passed a $1.3 trillion spending bill that dramatically increases funding for early education and care.

In total the bill’s provisions add up to “an increase of more than $3 BILLION for child care and early learning,” according to an email from the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC).

The funding includes a $2.37 billion increase for the Child Care and Development Block Grant and a $610 million increase for Head Start, as well as “new funding for other key early learning and after-school programs.”

NWLC says it’s “the single largest increase in child care funding in history.”

Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren said of this budget win, “It was a challenge to find affordable child care for my own kids – and it’s even harder for parents today. Which is why I fought tooth and nail to nearly double child care funding in this year’s federal budget.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Source: Center for American Progress

 

What makes high-quality child care so expensive? The Center for American Progress has a new interactive tool that makes it easy to see how much quality costs.

Advocates can use this tool to deliver one of the most important policy messages in early education: Quality costs much more than many parents can afford.

The most expensive aspect of quality? Teachers’ pay and benefits.

To learn more, use the interactive tool. Click on the link above and enter your state and whether you want to see the costs for an infant, toddler, or preschool-age child.

Once you choose, a graphic pops up. There’s a picture of a classroom and a list of options with on/off switches such as “fewer children per teacher,” “increase contribution to health insurance,” and “make the classroom bigger.”

In Massachusetts, for example, the base price for a preschool child is $893 per month. But click on “provide more time for teachers to plan lessons,” and two (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: