Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Sally Fuller testifying at the State House. 

“Growing up as the ‘whoops child’ for a mother who taught high-school English, Sally C. Fuller could not avoid being engulfed in a world of words. Her siblings were 10 and 12 years older, so Fuller wound up being her mother’s focus.”

“It was in 2005 that Fuller first became associated with the Irene E. and George A. Davis Foundation when she was named project manager for the Springfield Cherish Every Child initiative. She has most recently overseen the foundation’s Read! Reading Success by 4th Grade community initiative with a goal of ensuring all of Springfield’s children are reading proficiently by the end of the third-grade.”

“Fuller will be feted this week upon the occasion of her retirement with a gathering at the Community Music School.”

“For Sally Fuller and Reading Success by 4th Grade initiative, gift of words enriches children’s lives: Viewpoint,” by Cynthia Simison, MassLive.com, June 17, 2018

 

A child scribbles a spiral on a piece of paper. What should a teacher say in response?

One answer: “Lovely.”

Why? To encourage the child to keep drawing, because it’s by doing more drawing that a child gets to explore art and the horizons of his or her talent.

That’s one of the many stories, insights, and ideas that educators will find at the multimedia exhibit “Wonder of Learning,” which is being hosted by the recently merged Boston University Wheelock College of Education & Human Development.

Wonder of Learning shares the Reggio Emilia approach, a philosophy of early learning — named after the Italian town Reggio Emilia — that challenges educators to understand how their “image of a child” affects how they teach and interact with that child.

“It’s necessary that we believe that the child is very intelligent, that the child is strong and beautiful and has very ambitious desires and requests,” Reggio Emilia’s founder, Loris Malaguzzi, said at a 1993 seminar. “This is the image of the child that we need to hold.” Continue Reading »

Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

 

The Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) put its annual report to the Legislature on line in February. It’s a helpful resource for advocates and other sector stakeholders that looks back at how Massachusetts invested in young children in 2017. It highlights the state’s past progress in key areas getting attention in 2018, such as workforce supports and early childhood mental health. The state has done lots of good work that it can be proud of — and it has challenges that require attention and creative solutions.

“The Department of Early Education and Care serves as the entry point of Massachusetts’ birth to 21 education pipeline,” the report says. Guided by its Strategic Plan, EEC is working to make progress in four areas: Continue Reading »

“How can we all speak up on behalf of our county’s youngest residents? By using the power of our voice to create real and lasting change.

“Advocating for policy change can be big or small. For example, you can urge your government to invest more in schools. You can petition your school committee to adopt a health curriculum that has been proven to make a significant difference in outcomes, or you can mobilize residents to speak out on a critical community issue in person, via phone or online.

“Berkshire United Way would like you to join us in advocating for universal pre-kindergarten for our children. According to Nobel Prize winner Dr. James Heckman, ‘The basic skills needed for success are formed before children enter school. Investing early helps to prevent the achievement gap, and investing in our most disadvantaged children provides the greatest returns.’”

“Live United: Advocating for early childhood education,” by Kristine Hazzard, president and CEO of Berkshire United Way, the Berkshire Eagle, June 5, 2018

Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

 

High quality early education programs can boost children’s health. But to do so, these programs need to build partnerships with health care providers.

To explore this idea, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop last year called “Exploring Early Childhood Care and Education Levers to Improve Population Health.” And last month, the National Academies released a report on the workshop.

“By weaving health promotion, preventive care, health literacy, and health care coordination into early care and education environments and making it easier for both health care providers and early care and education providers to coordinate and cooperate through policy levers, we can change the health status of entire geographies of children,” the report says, summing up the ideas of Debbie Chang, a member of the workshop’s planning committee and the Senior Vice President of Policy and Prevention at Nemours Children’s Health System. Continue Reading »

 

This past Sunday at Lowell High School, 11 Congressional candidates shared a crowded stage at the Kathy Reticker Forum for Children and Families and shared their ideas on family policy.

“We’re asking these candidates today how they’re going to support our most important national asset. Where are they going to put their support?” Pat Nelson, the executive director of the Concord Children’s Center, said at the event. “Will they put it where it’s needed most, where we know it leads to early success, in prenatal care and kindergarten?”

“We know the battle for funding for children is a hard-fought battle, and we want to know how you are going to fight it.” Continue Reading »

Photo source: UMass Boston press release.

 

“A record number of people—more than 100—attended the Institute for Early Education Leadership and Innovation‘s fifth annual Leadership Forum on Early Education Research, Policy, and Practice on Saturday, May 19.

“The day celebrated graduates of the leadership institute’s early educator leadership programs, provided a platform for ECE practitioners to discuss leadership for change and innovation in the field, and facilitated dialogue about advancing leadership pathways in early education and care in Massachusetts.

Executive Director Anne Douglass noted in her welcoming remarks that ECE providers have historically been overlooked when it comes to driving change in the field despite the fact that they are the experts who do the work every day.

“ ‘Too often early childhood educators are thought of as objects of change, rather than change agents,” said Douglass.’ ”

“ ‘How do we build a movement around our leadership?’ Douglass asked the crowd. ‘The people who are going to fix this problem are in this room.’ ”

“Leadership Forum Draws Record Participation, Spurs Conversations About Early Care and Education,” University of Massachusetts Boston, May 23, 2018

%d bloggers like this: