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Screenshot: Harvard Center for the Developing Child

 

“In this interactive feature, you will learn how the choices we make can help children and the community as a whole become more resilient in the face of serious challenges. Negative events can occur at any moment, and it’s your job to choose positive events to counteract these negatives. View Key Concepts: Resilience to learn more about the science of resilience.

“Choose carefully—you only have 20 ‘Resilience Bucks’ to spend.”

Harvard Center on the Developing Child

Screenshot from “Honoring Dr. T. Berry Brazelton (1918 – 2018): A Celebration”

In March, the world lost an early childhood champion who helped the public appreciate the power of investing well and often in the lives of very young children.

“Dr. T. Berry Brazelton, America’s most celebrated baby doctor since Benjamin Spock and the pediatrician who revolutionized our understanding of how children develop psychologically, died on Tuesday at his home in Barnstable, Mass., on Cape Cod. He was 99,” the New York Times reported, adding:

“Before Dr. Brazelton began practicing medicine in the early 1950s, the conventional wisdom about babies and child rearing was unsparingly authoritarian.”

Brazelton “rejected such beliefs and practices as being senseless, if not barbaric.

“ ‘He put the baby at the center of the universe,’ Dr. Barry Lester, a pediatrician and director of the Center for the Study of Children at Risk at Brown University, said…”

Born in Waco, Texas, and a graduate of Princeton University and Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, Brazelton has said that he was not close to his father.

“ ‘I’m sure he loved me,’ Dr. Brazelton later reflected, ‘but I never really knew him.’ His father’s remoteness, he added, ‘fueled my ambitions’ to better understand early father-child bonding,” the Boston Globe reported. Continue Reading »

Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

 

In 1999, the Barr Foundation started investing in early education. Since then, Barr has generously distributed early education grants totaling more than $47 million to a number of organizations including Strategies for Children.

In 2020, Barr will sunset its giving in this sector, but as it does so, the foundation is reflecting on two decades of work, and it has posted a group of legacy early education webpages that documents its efforts.

Kimberly Haskins, Barr’s senior program officer for Cross-Program Initiatives, says:

“It is essential to invest in high-quality, developmentally appropriate learning experiences for children. To improve the experience for all children for years to come, we also need to invest in research, policy and public education. Strategies for Children and organizations that help support effective systems are critical for the longer term healthy development of children and families.” Continue Reading »

“The nonprofit arm of the world’s largest business federation is sounding a stern warning: The skills gap feeding an unprecedented labor shortage will only worsen if companies don’t directly provide child care solutions.

“The need to educate the next generation of employees is growing exponentially as more parents enter the workforce, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation told executives during a yearlong road show across the U.S.—from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to Grand Rapids, Michigan, to Austin, Texas.”

“As much as companies might cringe at the thought of mixing business with early childhood education, mounting evidence shows that to stay competitive they must stop expecting cash-strapped state governments to fill day care gaps, said Abby Hills, director of communications for the foundation’s Center for Education and Workforce.”

“Child Care Is Corporate America’s Business,” by Jennifer Oldham, Slate, May 7, 2018

“Leading the Way,” is a series featuring the next generation of leaders in the field of early education and care.

Lynn Santiago-Calling

For Lynn Santiago-Calling, leadership means connecting people.

Santiago-Calling is the new executive director of MAAEYC, the Massachusetts Association for the Education of Young Children, and she is working to help the organization grow.

MAAEYC is an affiliate of NAEYC, the National Association for Education of Young Children. Affiliates share NAEYC’s “core value” of “creating opportunities to widen our reach to early educators.”

“Our goal,” Santiago-Calling says, “is to move the profession forward.”

How? The organization is developing a strategic, five-year plan, and Santiago-Calling is building relationships. She and MAAEYC’s board want to increase membership and attract younger early educators.

“I’ve been going out to chapter meetings to get to know people, but those are the people who are already involved and engaged. I also want to hear from folks who are members but not actively engaged and ask them why aren’t you actively engaged? What can we do to engage you? Is there something that we’re missing? I want to hear from our members — and from nonmembers as well.” Continue Reading »

Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

 

On Thursday, May 10, 2018, Senate Ways and Means Chair Karen Spilka released a $41.42 billion budget proposal for fiscal year 2019.

The Senate budget is slightly higher than Governor Baker’s proposal and slightly lower than the House budget.

For early education and care, the Senate budget invests $5 million in preschool expansion, increases funds for child care resource and referral agencies, and level funds most other programs. Unlike the House, the Senate budget does not include a rate reserve for early educator salaries.

The Senate budget’s executive summary states: “Skills learned in early childhood directly impact future academic achievement and personal and economic success. The Committee’s budget invests in kids beginning at birth and seeks to remove barriers to access and quality care.”

Additional reporting on the Senate budget and its implications can be found at MassLive and The Boston Globe.

The Senate will debate amendments to the budget on May 22. Visit Strategies for Children’s website for a complete list of early education line items.

Stay tuned for more information on amendments and advocacy opportunities.

 

 

“ ‘It’s like we have to be behavior detectives,’ Tweety Yates, an expert facilitator from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, tells a group of pre-K and kindergarten teachers in San Jose, California. ‘It’s not always easy to figure out why a child is doing something.’ “

“Video: Growing Stronger Pre-K Teachers in San Jose, California,” by Sarah Jackson, New America, May 2, 2018

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