Archive for the ‘Quotes’ Category

“Virtually nobody was against expanding the state’s preschool program, and plenty of research was provided as to benefits of existing programs.

“But the arguments crystallized — and the attendees figuratively caught their breath – when a veteran kindergarten teacher from Freehold came forward with a packet of Week One assessments from some of her new students.

“Randee Mandelbaum’s new students were asked to draw crayon self-portraits and demonstrate how well they knew their letters and numbers. On the left side of the sheets was the work of children who hadn’t been through preschool, and on the right side were those who had.”

“‘You will see one student does not know any letters, cannot write any letters, and doesn’t even know how to write her own name,’ said Mandelbaum, a 20-year veteran. ‘While the other student can write most of the alphabet comfortably.’”

“Kindergarten Kids’ Drawings, Numbers Graphically Show Why Pre-K is Key,” by John Mooney, NJSpotlight.com, September 22, 2015

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“It’s time to do something different. We need to reshape the primary years and re-envision the elementary school. The K-5 model starts too late and is usually disconnected from early care and education providers such as pre-K centers. Instead, primary education should start at age 3, and each year of a young child’s life should be marked by teachers who work together, grade by grade, to offer age-appropriate and research-based learning experiences up through third grade.”

“First day of kindergarten: A key transition,” by Laura Bornfreund, deputy director of the early education initiative at the think tank New America, and Lisa Guernsey, director of the early education initiative and the Learning Technologies Project at New America, in an opinion piece on CNN’s website, September 8, 2015

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“Preschool is founded on play; experts say it’s how children learn best. But not all play is the same.

“How, then, should parents decide what school is right for their child? They can readily compare cost and location, but quality is tougher to discern…”

“Jane Lannak, director of the Early Childhood Learning Lab at Boston University and a clinical associate professor, said children need to develop a love of learning as they play, and to feel respected and part of the classroom community.

“One good way to foster those ideals is to help them follow their interests, she said. Parents should look for a program with structure in which children make some choices about what activities they do.”

From “How to pick the right preschool for your child,” by Jennette Barnes, the Boston Globe, July 30, 2015

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“The implications of the study’s findings are far-reaching… First, there’s a message to educators that social and emotional learning can be just as important as cognitive skills.”

“The new study, a comprehensive 20-year examination of 800 children from kindergarten through their mid-20s published Thursday in the American Journal of Public Health, found a link between a child’s social skills in kindergarten and how well they were doing in early adulthood.”

“Study: Behavior in kindergarten linked to adult success,” by Kelly Wallace, CNN, July 16, 2015

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“A couple of interesting things here, though – it’s amazing that something that you’re measuring in kindergarten can predict anything at all 15 to 20 years down the road.

“But the second thing that’s important is that not all social skills might matter to the same extent. Teachers also rated these kindergarten students on their aggressiveness, but researchers find that these ratings do not predict whether kids will get in trouble with the police 15 to 20 years later. Again, it’s the pro-social skills – the ability to put yourself in someone else’s shoes – this is what shapes the likelihood that you’ll stay out of trouble later on.”

Shankar Vedantam, NPR’s social science correspondent, speaking in “Nice Kids Finish First: Study Finds Social Skills Can Predict Future Success,” July 16, 2015

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“When policymakers and citizens talk about expanding children’s access to high-quality early education, they sometimes overlook the need for a stable stream of funding for early education programs. Instead, programs serving children birth-to-five are typically funded by a patchwork of streams blended or braided together to serve as many children as possible. Without dedicated funding for early care and education, state agencies are left to piece together revenue sources for their youngest children. Unsurprisingly, this leaves many states, including South Carolina, with underfunded programs.”

“Funding Education for our Youngest Learners,” by Kaycie Gillette-Mallard, a post on the New America Foundation’s EdCentral blog, July 13, 2015


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Photo Source: Governor Inslee's Facebook page

Photo Source: Governor Jay Inslee’s Facebook page

“I signed a landmark bill for our state’s littlest learners today. The Early Start Act will help more than 48,000 children get access to quality early learning thanks to historic new levels of funding. This is about creating a continuum of education which starts with our youngest learners, and extends right on through college. Thanks to everyone who helped fight this fight. It doesn’t end here, but today – we celebrate!”

Washington Governor Jay Inslee writing on his Facebook page, July 6, 2015

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“I want to congratulate Gov. Jay Inslee, educators, and other leaders in Washington state on the Early Start Act, which will improve early learning opportunities for over 48,000 children, building on the successes the state’s Race to the Top — Early Learning Challenge grant. It’s a huge step toward a vision for a comprehensive early learning system that will make Washington a leader in doing the right thing for our youngest children. I hope more states will answer President Obama’s call to expand early learning opportunities – and that Congress will support them.”

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, in a statement, July 7, 2015

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“Woooohoooooo! Fantastic news for SO many early learners & ECE professionals throughout our state! Thank you Governor Inslee for remaining focused on our most valuable resource! Advocate, educate, legislate! ♡”

Beka Johnston, commenting on Governor Inslee’s Facebook post, July 7, 2015


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Rahm Emanuel.  Photo Source: Chicago Mayor's Office Facebook page

Rahm Emanuel.
Photo Source: Chicago Mayor’s Office Facebook page

“Mayor Rahm Emanuel and the Chicago Public Library (CPL) today announced a mobile early learning program to deliver early learning enrichment opportunities in neighborhoods where children can benefit from additional enrichment experiences. The services will be delivered on-site at over 200 early childhood centers in high priority, high need communities. The STEAM mobile units will allow the city to serve approximately 8,000 children per year through multiple visits…

“The curriculum, developed collaboratively with the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry and aligned with Early Head Start standards, includes several hands-on STEAM learning activities for young children along with family literacy programming facilitated by librarians. CPL will dispatch three vans with these STEAM-based learning kits throughout the city – one for each Library District.”

“Mayor Emanuel Announces Mobile STEAM and Early Learning Outreach Services,” a press release from the City of Chicago, June 16, 2015

“If our children cannot get to some of Chicago’s world-class cultural institutions, the City of Chicago will bring the education that those institutions provide directly to their classrooms… The STEAM mobile units will give more students access to this high quality learning model, ensuring that they are prepared for a successful future.”

Mayor Rahm Emanuel, quoted in the article “Chicago Rolls Out Mobile Early Childhood Learning Services Focused On STEM And Art,” ChicagoInno, June 17, 2015

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