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Archive for the ‘Professional development & preparation’ Category

Photo Source: WIDA Store

Photo Source: WIDA Store

Tomorrow and Thursday, the Department of Early Education and Care — in partnership with WIDA Early Years — is hosting a two-day institute on the WIDA Early English Language Development (E-ELD) Standards Framework.

“Participants will gain a deeper understanding of the WIDA Early English Language Development (E-ELD) Standards Framework, and how to apply that understanding to their daily work with children,” according to a program announcement.

We recently blogged about E-ELD here.

Participants who attend the institute will be able to:

• “Identify the foundational principles and components of the WIDA E-ELD Standards Framework”  (more…)

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gala programOn April 3, 2015, some 200 early educators gathered in Randolph for the 14th annual Early Educators Awards Gala sponsored by the Boston Association for the Education of Young Children (BAEYC).

The gala celebrates Greater Boston’s early childhood educators and their contributions to the development of young children. The event also recognizes outstanding educators and high-quality programs. Our own Amy O’Leary, Early Education for All Campaign Director, served as the evening’s Mistress of Ceremonies.

Debbie LeeKeenan was awarded the Abigail Eliot Award. The award honors outstanding commitment to young children and the early childhood profession not only through work done on behalf of BAEYC, but also through a record of distinguished professional achievement.

The award is named after Abigail Adams Eliot, a pioneer in early childhood education and in training teachers of young children. Ms. Eliot, who died in 1992 at the age of 100, was founder of the Ruggles Street Nursery School in Roxbury, the first nursery school in the country; and one of the few that provided training in early childhood education. (more…)

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Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

Imagine a citywide approach to helping young children prepare for school.

That’s the city New Bedford is striving to be. The city’s public school system is working with local center-based preschool providers, as well as diverse stakeholders including the New Bedford Art Museum, the city’s housing authority, and the United Way of New Bedford to develop school readiness programs.

“We’ve never really had that alignment conversation,” Diane Sullivan said in a recent interview. Sullivan is the supervisor of Early Childhood Special Education for New Bedford Public Schools.

Sullivan helps lead the Birth through Third Grade Alignment Partnership effort, which has been underway in New Bedford since fall 2014. The work is funded by the Department of Early Education and Care, using federal Early Learning Challenge funds.

Taking what Sullivan calls a “good first step,” New Bedford has decided to focus on helping preschool-age children build strong social and emotional skills.  (more…)

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Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

We know what to do; we just need to do it.

That’s the conclusion of a new report published by the Institute of Medicine called, “Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation.” (We’ve blogged about the institute’s work here.)

As a brief on the report explains, “The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and National Research Council (NRC) were commissioned to explore the science of child development, particularly looking at implications for the professionals who work with children birth through age 8.”

“…much is known about how children learn and develop,” as well as about “what professionals who provide care and education for children need to know and be able to do, and what professional learning supports they need.”

And while “much of that knowledge increasingly informs standards for what should be, it is not fully reflected in what is—the current capacities and practices of the workforce, the settings in which they work, the policies and infrastructure that set qualifications and provide professional learning, and the government and other funders who support and oversee these systems.”  (more…)

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Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

The Massachusetts Association for the Education of Young Children (MassAEYC) is holding its 11th annual spring conference — “Children: A Link to Our Future” — on March 27th and 28th, 2015.

The event will be held at the Westford Regency Inn & Conference Center, located at 219 Littleton Road, in Westford, Mass. And registration has been extended until tomorrow.

The conference’s keynote speaker will be Lisa Murphy, an early childhood specialist and the founder and CEO of Ooey Gooey, Inc., a company that provides workshops and training sessions.

Murphy’s topic is “Many Kinds of Smart! Understanding the Theory of Multiple Intelligences.”

“Think you are good at your job because you love children?” the conference brochure asks in its description of Murphy’s presentation. “What about the ones that challenge you?”

Using these questions as a framework, Murphy “puts her own spin on Howard Gardner’s classic theory.”

“By providing easy to implement, yet possibly challenging, ‘comfort zone stretchers,’ Lisa challenges teachers to make sure they are celebrating all of the children in the classroom, not just the ones they like.” (more…)

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Educators in West Michigan are tackling third grade reading proficiency by pooling their resources to form the Reading Now Network Initiative. And a recently conducted field team study suggests that intensive efforts are paying off.

Reading proficiency is also getting attention from Michigan’s Republican Governor Rick Snyder, who has called for new efforts to boost reading outcomes.

West Michigan’s Efforts

Launched last year, Reading Now is “the collective effort of superintendents, school boards, [and] local and intermediate school districts throughout West Michigan to improve early literacy and, ultimately, student achievement across all grade levels,” according to a fact sheet(more…)

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Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

Federally funded home visiting programs have gotten a vote of confidence from a recent report.

Unfortunately, funding for this important program is being held up in Congress.

“The federal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting, or MIECHV, program has supported high-risk families in communities across the country through intensive home visiting services since 2010,” according to the report, “An Investment in Our Future: How Federal Home Visiting Funding Provides Critical Support for Parents and Children.”

Released by CLASP (the Center for Law and Social Policy) and the Center for American Progress, the report is based on interviews with officials from 20 states and two tribal organizations.

Support from the States

The program has widespread local support, as a recent op-ed in the Salt Lake Tribune shows:

“Sometimes it can be easy to forget there are such pressing needs in Utah… Our business community, economy, and government regularly receive national recognition for their well-deserved successes,” writes Kirk L. Jowers, the University of Utah’s Director of the Hinckley Institute of Politics.  (more…)

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