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Archive for the ‘NAEYC’ Category


 

A new video from NAEYC (the National Association for the Education of Young Children) offers an engaging look at men in early education.

“Often when males are mentioned as it relates to being in the classroom, they’re often viewed as a disciplinarian,” Alvin Irby says in the video. “You know, someone who’s gonna — who the boys are going to listen to. And I think that there’s so much more to men being in early childhood classrooms.” Irby is the chief reading inspirer at Barbershop Books, a nonprofit effort “To close the reading achievement gap for young black boys by using child-centered, culturally relevant, and high-impact strategies.”

“I think that men bring a sense of wonder to curriculum,” Sandra Lanz, a child development specialist says in the video. (more…)

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Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

There’s mom. There’s apple pie. And across the country, there is widespread, bipartisan support for early education and early educators.

That’s the finding of a new market research study commissioned by NAEYC (the National Association for the Education of Young Children).

Now NAEYC is working to turn this popular support into transformative action.

The research findings highlight “three discrete yet interconnected areas: (1) the image of the profession; (2) paths to define and grow the profession; and (3) voters’ commitment to investing in the profession,” NAEYC explains on its website.

NAEYC’s market research builds on an Institute of Medicine report called, “Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth through Age 8,” which was released earlier this year.

While the Institute of Medicine report drew on the knowledge of experts, NAEYC sought feedback from voters and early educators. Specifically NAEYC’s research had four parts:

• in-depth, online qualitative interviews with early educators

• a quantitative online survey of early educators

• four focus groups with current educators and those interested in entering the field, and

• a national survey of 950 voters (more…)

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Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

 

Three things we’re grateful for:

New America’s report on Massachusetts’ birth-to-third-grade policies

This amusing article about what reading does to your brain and the news that the national nonprofit RIF (Reading is Fundamental) plans to give away collections of “50 high quality children’s picture e-books.” To find out more go to www.billionebookgift.org

* This cool conference video from NAEYC (the National Association for the Education of Young Children) and the power of early educators. Click here to see more NAEYC videos.

 

 

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book cover“This book speaks about change and change makers—early educators asking an essential question of conscience: Are we doing the right thing?”

That’s the opening sentence of the dynamic, new book, “The New Early Childhood Professional: A Step-by-Step Guide for Overcoming Goliath.” It’s a sweeping look at how early educators can manage both roiling change and entrenched problems and become the leaders that children — and the country — need them to be.

The book’s authors are Valora Washginton, the chief executive officer of the Council for Professional Recognition and the founder of the CAYL Institute (Community Advocates for Young Learners); Brenda Gadson, the owner of BMG Consulting, and Kathryn L. Amel, CAYL’s associate manager for programs and operations. The book was co-published by Columbia University’s Teachers College Press and the National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Now is the time for early educators to lead, according to Jacqueline Jones, president and CEO of The Foundation for Child Development, who wrote in a NIEER blog post, “The hard work of defining the profession requires leadership (more…)

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Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

 

The action never seems to stop in preschool classrooms. But appearances can be deceiving. Researchers from the University of Washington report that children are not always getting enough opportunities for active play.

“Parents feel as if their young children are constantly in motion. But new research suggests that children in preschool have few opportunities for active play and are often sedentary,” a blog on the New York Times’ Motherlode website says.

To conduct this study — “Active Play Opportunities at Child Care” — researchers observed 98 children attending 10 preschools in Seattle. Each preschool was observed for four full days.

The study found that children’s activity was 73 percent sedentary, 13 percent light, and 14 percent of what researchers call “moderate-vigorous physical activity.”

The study found “that for 88 percent of child care time, children were not presented opportunities for active play, so the finding that more than 70 percent of children’s time was sedentary is not surprising.”  (more…)

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Photo: Courtesy of the Milton Early Childhood Alliance

Photo: Courtesy of the Milton Early This bChildhood Alliance

This blog was originally published on May 12, 2014. 

On a rainy day last month in Milton, preschoolers and their parents wearing raincoats and boots went for a “StoryWalk,” at Mass Audubon’s Blue Hills Trailside Museum.

What’s a StoryWalk? Children go for a walk and stop along the way where the pages of a book are posted so they can hear the story read aloud — or read it themselves or to a younger sibling.

In this case, the book read was “Possum and the Peeper” by Anne Hunter, a seasonally appropriate book about a possum woken from his winter nap by peeping sounds. Laminated pages of the book were posted along the way. The Patriot Ledger has a photo gallery of the StoryWalk here.

Susan Dolan, the director of the Milton Early Childhood Alliance, organized this StoryWalk with the Trailside Museum, and she explains that StoryWalks promote early literacy, encourage parents and children to do outdoor activities, and support the crucial idea that parents are their children’s first teachers. In addition, Dolan says, StoryWalks introduce parents and children to new books. (more…)

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Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

We know what to do; we just need to do it.

That’s the conclusion of a new report published by the Institute of Medicine called, “Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation.” (We’ve blogged about the institute’s work here.)

As a brief on the report explains, “The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and National Research Council (NRC) were commissioned to explore the science of child development, particularly looking at implications for the professionals who work with children birth through age 8.”

“…much is known about how children learn and develop,” as well as about “what professionals who provide care and education for children need to know and be able to do, and what professional learning supports they need.”

And while “much of that knowledge increasingly informs standards for what should be, it is not fully reflected in what is—the current capacities and practices of the workforce, the settings in which they work, the policies and infrastructure that set qualifications and provide professional learning, and the government and other funders who support and oversee these systems.”  (more…)

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