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Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

The Massachusetts Association for the Education of Young Children (MassAEYC) is holding its 11th annual spring conference — “Children: A Link to Our Future” — on March 27th and 28th, 2015.

The event will be held at the Westford Regency Inn & Conference Center, located at 219 Littleton Road, in Westford, Mass. And registration has been extended until tomorrow.

The conference’s keynote speaker will be Lisa Murphy, an early childhood specialist and the founder and CEO of Ooey Gooey, Inc., a company that provides workshops and training sessions.

Murphy’s topic is “Many Kinds of Smart! Understanding the Theory of Multiple Intelligences.”

“Think you are good at your job because you love children?” the conference brochure asks in its description of Murphy’s presentation. “What about the ones that challenge you?”

Using these questions as a framework, Murphy “puts her own spin on Howard Gardner’s classic theory.”

“By providing easy to implement, yet possibly challenging, ‘comfort zone stretchers,’ Lisa challenges teachers to make sure they are celebrating all of the children in the classroom, not just the ones they like.” (more…)

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Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

What makes a high-quality preschool or out-of-school-time space?

Lots of things, including natural light and fresh paint; engaging spaces where children can play, read, or try on hats and costumes; a good heating and cooling system; easy access to fully equipped outdoor play spaces; and modern, functional bathrooms.

Unfortunately, a 2011 report from the Children’s Investment Fund (CIF) revealed that a number of early education and out-of-school-time programs were located in problematic spaces. Deficiencies ranged from holes in the ceiling and leaking toilets to poor air quality and outdoor play spaces that were really just parking lots.

Thanks, however, to the advocacy work of CIF and others, the Massachusetts Legislature used the 2013 Housing and Community Development Bond Bill to create the new $45 million Early Education and Out of School Time (EEOST) Capital Fund(more…)

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Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

Are you preparing to build a new early childhood or out-of-school-time space?

The Children’s Investment Fund (CIF) wants to know.

“We would like to identify organizations with capital needs that may be eligible for the EEOST Capital Fund in subsequent funding rounds within the next four years, so we can help with the early planning and predevelopment process,” according to an email announcement from Mav Pardee, CIF’s program manager. “If you are thinking about a facility improvement project, please complete the following survey.

The EEOST is the new Early Education and Out of School Time Capital Fund. Supported by CIF and other organizations, the five-year, $45 million capital fund was created by Massachusetts’ lawmakers last year.

The capital fund will finance grants that can be used to pay for acquisition, design, construction, repair, and renovations. To be eligible applicants must be nonprofit, tax-exempt, licensed programs where at least 25 percent of enrolled children receive subsidies. The Department of Early Education and Care will release applications for the grant this summer. (more…)

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Photo: Micaela Bedell For Strategies for Children

Photo: Micaela Bedell For Strategies for Children

Early childhood is getting new attention from the 4th Annual Healthy People/Healthy Economy Report Card.

“The annual report card examines progress in 12 issue areas that can be linked to improvements in public health,” according to a news release from the Boston Foundation, a member of the Healthy People/Healthy Economy Coalition, which released the report.

“Research continues to show that high quality early childhood care and education not only prepare children for success in school, they create a foundation for good health over the course of a lifetime,” the report says, adding, “Children who receive good care and education in their preschool years gain as much as a full year of development and educational growth compared to children entering school without the benefit of early services.”

“Expanding early childhood education has been a key piece of education discussions this year, but we know its impact isn’t limited to academics,” Paul Grogan, president and CEO of the Boston Foundation, said in the news release. Grogan is also co-chair of the Healthy People/Healthy Economy Coalition. (more…)

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Photo: Courtesy of the City of Boston

Photo: Courtesy of the City of Boston

Here’s an exciting birth announcement from The City of Boston, the Boston Housing Authority, and Nurtury (formerly known as Associated Early Care and Education):

It’s a brand new building!

The Nurtury Learning Lab at Bromley-Heath

Serving children ages 0 to 8

20,000 square feet of classroom space

14,000 square feet of outdoor learning and play areas

LEED Gold Certification

Click here for the Facebook Pictures!

The new building had its ribbon cutting ceremony on Monday. And Boston Mayor Marty Walsh helped out with the ceremonial scissors.

“The Nurtury Learning Lab, located at the Boston Housing Authority’s (BHA) Bromley-Heath public housing development in Jamaica Plain, will anchor a campus of services for children and families,” according to a press release. The building “integrates early education, family and community learning opportunities and support, and professional development activities for early educators throughout Boston and eastern Massachusetts.” (more…)

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The Boston Strong Tower. Photo: Courtesy of the Boston Public Schools.

The Boston Strong Tower. Photo: Courtesy of the Boston Public Schools.

“Dear Boston Public School Kindergarteners,” Mayor Marty Walsh wrote in a letter last February. Walsh introduced himself and added that as some of Boston’s “youngest and most important residents” the children had the right to share their opinions about the city.

Walsh went on to ask this question: “What suggestions do you have about construction in our city to make Boston a fairer and more interesting place for children?”

It’s easy to focus on how cute this request is, but at the heart of this letter is a meaningful invitation for children to be engaged young citizens.

“This is a big question so take your time in answering it. Talk to your classmates, your teachers, and your family. Do research to get ideas. Write your ideas and please make a model to help me understand your ideas better,” the mayor wrote, encouraging kindergarteners to engage in civic discussions. (more…)

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Photo: United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley

Photo: United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley

More than 200 people came to the Boston Children’s Museum last Thursday night to attend “Conversation with the Boston Mayoral Candidates – Early Childhood and Education: Closing the Achievement and Opportunity Gaps.”  Strategies for Children, Boston Children’s Museum, Thrive in 5 and United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley cosponsored the event along with 31 other organizations.

Both candidates – City Councilor John Connolly and State Representative Marty Walsh — participated, each on stage separately. Candidates answered questions posed by the night’s moderator, WBZ political reporter Jon Keller, and from the audience, which included early educators, providers, pediatricians, college students, professors of higher education, teachers, advocates, and citizens.

As Carolyn Lyons, the president and CEO of Strategies for Children, explained to the audience in her introduction, the forum builds on the momentum that has been fueled by early education proposals from Governor Deval Patrick and other governors,  the Massachusetts legislature and President Obama’s bold proposal to expand preschool programs nationally.

The candidates were asked to come prepared to articulate their vision for Boston’s children and families and discuss what they would do for children and families should they become mayor. They responded by (more…)

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