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Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

“Every week in the United States, child care providers care for nearly 11 million children younger than age 5 whose mothers are working,” according to a new report.

Given those numbers, the United States has to “recognize the value of child care as an investment in early childhood education and as a support system for working families,” if we want to “remain competitive in the 21st-century global economy…”

This annual report — the “2015 State Fact Sheets,” — was just released by the nonprofit organization Child Care Aware of America (CCAoA).

Founded in 1987, CCAoA is “a national membership-based nonprofit organization working to advance affordability, accessibility, development and learning of children in child care.”

The report provides data on “America’s working families and the circumstances they face,” making it a “critical tool for child care advocates, policymakers and program administrators to guide decision-making about child care programs and costs.” Continue Reading »

“At the current growth rate, it would take about 75 years for states to enroll just 50 percent of their 4-year-olds in preschool and 150 years to reach 70 percent enrollment. In the nine states that do not fund preschool at all, it would take even longer.”

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan’s op-ed, “Increase access to quality preschool,” in the The Hill, June 9, 2015

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“There is a new beginning in California for economic development and ending mass incarceration. Yesterday, Gov. Jerry Brown agreed to allot an additional $265 million to fund 7,000 additional preschool slots and 6,800 child care slots, plus a rate increase for all providers. It’s a major step forward for the state we call home.”

Joseph DiSalvo’s op-ed, “Silicon Valley Coalition Plays Key Role in Funding Early Education,” in San Jose Inside, June 17, 2015

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“Don’t you think they grow up pretty fast for being two.”

Seattle Nursing Home Resident in a video clip made by filmmaker Evan Briggs and featured in the ABC News story “Seattle Preschool in a Nursing Home ‘Transforms’ Elderly Residents,” June 16, 2015

Mariama Grimes

Mariama Grimes

Born and raised in Sacramento, Calif., Mariama Grimes has spent the last few years in Cambridge braving the cold and attending the Doctor of Education Leadership (Ed. L.D.) program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE).

Now Mariama has joined Strategies for Children for the next ten months to lead a project in support of SFC’s strategic plan implementation and local community work. This year-long residency is an experience that culminates with a dissertation. We’re happy to welcome her aboard, and we look forward to the outreach work she’ll be doing in various communities.

“I’ve always been interested in politics,” Mariama said in a recent interview, explaining that as a kid she had playing cards that featured politicians rather than baseball stars. In addition, Mariama’s father, Roy Grimes, was involved in educational policy in California, serving as president of the Sacramento County School Board and of the Sacramento City Unified School District. Continue Reading »

Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

On Monday, June 22, 2015, House and Senate leaders extended Governor Baker’s two-week interim budget into a one-month spending bill intended to cover state spending beyond July 1. According to the State House News Service, the $2.7 billion interim budget bill will fund state agencies and programs for one month based on fiscal 2015 appropriation levels.

The six-member conference committee now has until July 14 to reach a compromise on the larger $38.1 billion spending plan for fiscal 2016. The one-month spending bill takes into account Governor Baker’s allowable 10 days for review and approval of the budget.

Stay tuned for more information while the details of the FY16 annual spending plan are finalized.

Visit our website for a complete listing of early education and care line items in the state budget, or contact Titus DosRemedios at tdosremedios@strategiesforchildren.org for more information. 

Mayor Michael A. Nutter. Photo Source: City of Philadelphia Flickr account.

Mayor Michael A. Nutter. Photo Source: City of Philadelphia Flickr account.

Philadelphia Mayor Michael A. Nutter has just released an exciting and sweeping plan to revitalize his city’s early learning programs. It’s a detailed effort that could also serve as a blueprint for other cities.

Called “A Running Start Philadelphia: For Every Child Birth to 5,” the plan is a path toward ensuring that all of the city’s children are ready to succeed in school.

“What happens — or doesn’t happen — from infancy to the time a child enters kindergarten can set the course for his or her whole life,” the plan says. “And what happens — or doesn’t happen — in the first five years of life for Philadelphia’s 110,000 children can set the course for the long-term future of our entire city.”

One daunting obstacle is poverty.

“Two years ago, the City unveiled Shared Prosperity Philadelphia, a comprehensive plan that brings together hundreds of individuals and organizations to address our city’s unacceptable poverty level,” the plan says, adding that early learning is “a critical component of the plan” to avoid “passing on the crippling legacy of poverty to a new generation…” Continue Reading »

“Every child should have the tools and the skills to thrive in tomorrow’s economy, especially those kids from our most vulnerable and at-risk communities… I believe the time has come to make preschool and quality childcare available to every child in America.”

Hillary Clinton in the AP news story “Hillary Clinton seeks ‘high quality preschool’ for all 4-year-olds,” June 15, 2015

Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

Tomorrow is National Summer Learning Day, so break out the sunscreen and some engaging educational activities that will help stop the “summer slide” of learning losses that some children experience during the warm, out-of-school months.

An annual day of national advocacy, National Summer Learning Day is led by the National Summer Learning Association (NSLA), which seeks “to elevate the importance of keeping kids learning, safe and healthy every summer,” according to the association’s website.

“Research shows that summers without quality learning opportunities put our nation’s youth at risk for falling behind – year after year – in core subjects like math and reading. The math and reading skills low-income students lose each summer are cumulative and contribute significantly to the achievement gap between lower- and higher-income kids,” the website adds.

That’s why this year, “NSLA is asking everyone — programs, families, schools, educators, policymakers, businesses — to make summer a season of learning by pledging to #KeepKidsLearning on our interactive map.” Continue Reading »

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